Saturday, March 25, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of Chicago, 1871 - 1885


History of Chicago: From the fire of 1871 until 1885

Alfred Theodore Andreas
A. T. Andreas, 1886 - Chicago (Ill.)





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, March 24, 2017

Fearless Females 2017 :: Week 3



Social Butterfly:
What social organizations or groups did your mother or grandmother belong to? Sewing circle, church group, fraternal benefit society or lodge? Describe her role in the group.

Yes! Yes and yes! Let's talk about my grandmother. The Queen of Genealogy! She was heavily involved with the So Cal Gen Society back in her day, she was also Regent of her DAR chapter. My mom was our Girl Scout leader for a time and participated in our grade schools as Room Mother at various times. Does that count?

Special Talent:
Shining star: Did you have a female ancestor who had a special talent? Artist, singer, actress, athlete, seamstress, or other? Describe.

As I shared last week, my great grandmother apparently liked to paint. I am fortunate enough to possess a painting done by her. Were there others? I don't know. Mine is not signed, but it is pretty good I can't imagine it was a one-and-done.

Surprising Fact:
Have you discovered a surprising fact about one of your female ancestors? What was it and how did you learn it? How did you feel when you found out?

My 2nd great grandmother gave me quite the surprise. My 2nd great grandfather was not her first husband. She was divorced with a 6 year old son when she met and married my 2nd great grandfather. My great grandfather had a half-brother! I was shocked and surprised - and I really, really want to know more. The ex husband went on to remarry and have another family too. I was working a 'puzzle' - the 1860 census listed the newly married couple (my 2nd great grandparents) along with their first born son, plus a 10 year old boy and a 16 year old girl! I pounced on the girl first, the surname was the same as my 2nd great grandmother, who was a mystery as far as parents go - I thought she might be a lead. Nope. Then I tried the boy with a completely different surname. Jackpot! It was several years ago so I don't remember the details, but let's just say it involved a very deep rabbit hole ....

Brick Wall:
Is there a female ancestor who is your brick wall? Why? List possible sources for finding more information.

One?? One! Bwahaha! I have far too many, so many that I recently started a new series on my blog just for these Brick Wall women. Crowd sourcing! But, to answer the prompt, sideways research. FAN research. Go big, cast the net wide because sometimes that great-aunt of the second-cousin of the brother-in-law just might have the answer .....

Leading Lady Life:
If a famous director wanted to make a movie about one of your female ancestors who would it be? What actress would you cast in the role and why?

Easy. My great grandmother Bessie Twining Potwin. And her early married life when she and her husband left Des Moines for the frontier of Oklakoma. The couple lived there for three years before her husband came to his senses and returned to 'civilized' life. She told her daughter once that she swept the yard to keep the dirt flat - there was no grass! Also easy. Merle Streep - she has a strong family resemblance already and I could just picture her in the role.

Similarities:
Do you share any physical resemblance or personality trait with one of your female ancestors? Who? What is it?

Oh Geez! When I look in the mirror my mother looks back. I also resemble my maternal grandmother and her mother as well. Personality-wise I'd say I share their spirit of adventure and certainly my grandmother's obsession with genealogy!



..........until next week..........



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, March 23, 2017

Video Of The Week: Thinking About Becoming a Professional Genealogist?

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!









©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Ann Fraser and James D Winton

the 1880 John Fraser Family Tree

39. Ann Fraser (John - 11, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born December 20th 1837



married December 5th 1859 at West Mill



James D Winton born November 22nd 1829



children of this union:


i. Agnes Allan Winton b. November 23rd 1862 d. July 11th 1867

ii. James Winton b. October 14th 1864

iii. John Fraser Winton b. November 29th 1866

iv. Ann Winton b. July 3rd 1867

v. George Arthur Winton b. June 22nd 1868

vi. Margaret Drummond Winton b. UNK d. February 24th 1870


note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Catherine Houston {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

Catherine Houston (Sarah, James William) was born  about 1801 in Middletown, Orange Co, New York to parents Sarah Faulkner and Thomas Houston.

Catherine married David Corwin December 21st 1820 in Middletown, Orange Co, New York. David was the son of Daniel Corwin and Anna Hulse.

The couple had the following children:

  • Daniel  Corwin b. 19 Jun 1825 d. 1862 Iowa m. Mary Land
  • Sarah Ann Corwin b. 9 Apr 1827 d. 5 Jun 1890 m. Gabriel Smith Corwin
  • Emeline Corwin b. 2 Mar 1829 d. 26 Jun 1903 m. Oliver Lewis
  • Mary Corwin b. 26 Aug 1833 d. UNK m. John Davis Wilcox
  • Abigail Corwin b. 9 Feb 1837 d. 1852
  • Thomas H Corwin b. 1841 d. UNK 
photo courtesy Find A Grave


Catherine, David and the two youngest children were in Rockland Co, New York in 1850. David died May 23rd, 1857. Catherine's death is unknown. Their son Daniel was said to have died in Eddyville, IA. I found a listing on Find A Grave for a "D W Corwin" in Eddyville, IA - and with him a "David Corwin" (of Orange Co, New York) could this be David? And why is he buried in Iowa? And what happened to Catherine?

So many unanswered questions.





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, March 20, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Ten


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!


The Twining Papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.


Twining Story, cont.

Jesse Louis Twining, son of E W Twining, a Presbyterian minister, and his second wife Priscilla B Ashby. He spent the early years of childhood in many Iowa towns (the father was a pioneer minister who came to Iowa in 1840).

Jesse studied medicine and practical anatomy at Chicago's Northwestern University. He was in Chicago at the time of the historical Chicago Fire. Jesse's internship was Mercy Hospital, Chicago IL.

His bride (Flora Dell Rowley) met him while she was shopping for draperies in Brooks, Iowa with her father, Rev. Rossiter Clark Rowley.

Jesse was a railroad surgeon at Creston, IA before his marriage.

He was married in 1876 in the home of the bride. His father Rev E W Twining as well as the father of the bride officiated at the wedding.

Jesse was a pharmacist at the drug store in Corning, IA. Later he traveled for Arbuckle Coffee (which became Yuban). He was a loving, kind, friendly person. He adored his wife and children (there were four), his grandchildren and great grandchildren. (He died in 1933) He was a wonderful man and a good story teller. He had many fascinating experiences, had a fine sense of humor; a tease.

At one home, when a child near old Fort Des Moines, the regular army was billeted. As a young man he practiced medicine; so much illness and could not bear to see little children suffer; he ended and operated a drug store, he was the pharmacist.

He and wife lived in Corning for fifty years.

Jesse was past master of the Masonic Lodge; he was a Knight Templar and a Shriner. He belonged to the Blue Lodge and Eureka Chapter No. 77 in Corning, the Bethany Commendery at Creston, IA and Kaaba Temple of the Shriner at Davenport, IA.

Jesse L Twining was the doctor for the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad before he went into the drug (apothacary) business. His half-brother Ed continued in medical practice. In the store one of the products was 'JESS' Tea.

Grandpa Twining had an interesting 'sample room' that his grandchildren enjoyed getting into. This was in the old homestead, called the 'little room'. ~ETPT

Mr and Mrs Jesse Twining spent their last seven years with their daughter, Carrie Elizabeth and her husband Irving A Potwin. Mrs Twining died December 13th 1932. Jesse and Flora Dell were married in 1876. They were a devoted couple fifty-six years. He pined for her and was very lonely after her death. He rejoined her the following year in life eternal.



GENEALOGY

 Jesse Louis Twining b. 8/5/1850
                                   d. 4/7/1933
                                   m. 10/25/1876 to Flora Dell Rowley
                                       daughter of R C Rowley and Rhoda Ann Vredenburg
                                                                   b. 11/12/1857
                                                                    d. 12/13/1932

children: (all born Corning, IA)

Carrie Elizabeth b. 3/29/1881 d. 10/19/1969 m. 1/3/1899 to Irving A Potwin
Anna Jeanette b. 8/21/1883 d. 1918 m. 11/16/1912 to E Earl Williams
Jessie Lois b. 8/22/1885 d. 1/23/1977 m. 10/19/1910 to Jacob Earl Hydeman
Merrick Carlyle b. 6/26/1888 d. 5/27/1970 m. 7/21/1914 to Edna Mae Peterson



............to be continued..........


 ***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. ***



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, March 19, 2017

the Sunday Soapbox | DNA and 'Discoveries' ~ Who Is Bob's Mother?


Well, I'm no DNA expert. Far from it. But I do understand the basics. I've started the sometimes boring process of educating myself with seminars, webinars and reading material. I have a love/hate relationship with DNA. I love what it can add to my genealogical research, but I also hate the sometimes difficult reality that some matches may not ever be solved, in my lifetime anyway.

Then there's this other problem.

Maybe you've noticed it too.

The Ancestor Discoveries on Ancestry.

I don't pay much attention to them, but there they are every time I log in to my AncestryDNA page.

Maybe I'm ignorant. I'm not too proud to admit there's a lot I don't have working knowledge about.

But I ponder on this:

There is one particular "ancestor" that keeps showing up as a possible relation. She has been added to myriad family trees without much more documentation than someone else's tree. She has been added to a group of trees with whom I know I share a common, proved, ancestor. She has been declared the mother of this particular ancestor.

Problem is, there is no proof.

None.

Zip.

It's pure speculation.

So, like unsourced Public Trees, we (or I anyway) now have this issue of 'DNA' 'related' ancestors. And I'm thinking, I could put Bozo the Clown in my tree as this guy's (we'll call him Bob) mother. If everyone else who was a proved relation to Bob does the same thing well, I'd bet that Bozo would show up as an Ancestry Discovery!

I have red hair and I do have an odd fondness for clowns, but I'm certain Bozo and I are not related.

I'm okay with not knowing who Bob's mother is. The records most likely exist somewhere - we're talking 1800 Maryland - I will continue to pursue the truth and ignore the unproved.

But not everyone will.

How big of a problem will this become?

Am I way off base here, or is this a genuine concern?

I'd love to hear your thoughts!


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved





Saturday, March 18, 2017

Fearless Females 2017 :: Week 2


This week's prompts were very difficult for me for some reason.

Document Narrative:
Take a family document (baptismal certificate, passenger list, naturalization petition, etc.) and write a brief narrative using the information.

 I do not possess any of these types of documents for my female ancestors. My 3rd Great Grandmother, Elizabeth Chalmers, was married in Edinburgh, Scotland on March 25th 1832, and gave birth to her first child in Manhattan, New York on January 4th 1833. I do not know when the newlyweds left Scotland, but I do know Elizabeth was most certainly pregnant during the voyage across the ocean. Arriving in a strange new land with little time to set up a household before giving birth. Was she alone? Did she have neighbor women to help with the delivery? What courage this must have taken!

Religion:
What role did religion play in your family? How did your female ancestors practice their faith? If they did not, why didn’t they? Did you have any female ancestors who served their churches in some capacity?

Many of my female ancestors were minister's wives. Those women traveled from place to place, children in tow, as their husbands rode the circuit in pioneer America. Others were of the Quaker faith and played a larger part in their church. I know several of the ministers wives were involved in organizing local churches along with their husbands. And one Quaker ancestor was a land owner in her own right. I haven't pursued that yet.

Tragic Death:
Did you have any female ancestors who died young or from tragic or unexpected circumstances? Describe and how did this affect the family?

No tragic deaths! I was surprised. Most all of the women out lived the men, some by decades. I come from a hardy stock of females. My namesake lived to be 101. The one exception would be my paternal grandmother, who died when my father was 15. I really don't know much other than my father used to say she was 'sickly'. My father was an only child so this must have been a lonely time, but like so many men, he never really spoke of it.

Occupation or Career:
Working girl: Did your mother or grandmother work outside the home? What did she do? Describe her occupation.

Both my maternal grandmother and my mother worked. My grandmother was forced into it, her marriage was rocky and she needed to take care of herself and her children. She went to stenographer's school, which makes me laugh, she was a horrible typist! She was a House Mother when her youngest son and daughter went to college. Later she took on a role as a travel companion/live-in house manager for an elderly man in Bel-Air CA! She got to travel the world during that time.

My mother went back to school when I was about 12. First to nursing school, later she went on to get her Masters in Social Work and eventually became the head of the Social Work Dept at MacNeal Hospital in Berwyn IL.

Courage:
Moment of Strength: share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

I'd pick my great grandmother Carrie Twining Potwin, when she accompanied her husband, newborn daughter in tow, to the frontier of the Oklahoma Territory on one of his money-making schemes. Men!

Newsworthy:
Newsmakers? Did you have a female ancestor who made the news? Why? Was she famous or notorious? Did she appear in the social column?

IF anyone had been paying attention I think my 2nd great grandmother should have made the news. Twice divorced, a child from a previous marriage, getting married in different counties ..... or different states! I would love to know the real story there.

Six Word Tribute:
Write a six-word memoir tribute to one of your female ancestors.

Twenty presidents, three wars, long life.

Ladies Who Lunch:
If you could have lunch with any female family member (living or dead) or any famous female who would it be and why? Where would you go? What would you eat?

My grandmother, I think. We'd have wine and talk about genealogy! She's the one who started this, after all.



........until next week..........

©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, March 17, 2017

Field Notes: Is That Joseph or Joesph Langrill?


The whole thing started Sunday. I received an email from FamilySearch, a notification titled "Weekly FamilySearch changes for people you are watching". I opened it immediately. It looked wrong. I went to FamilySearch to see just what had been done.

Oh oh.

Can of worms.

The person I was watching was (I thought) my 5th great grandfather, Joseph Rowley; or Joseph L Rowley, or even sometimes Joseph Langrill Rowley. But the wife that FamilySearch had listed for him was wrong. The family they had listed for him was wrong.

This was not a case of someone 'fixing' a family without any knowledge (for a change) No, this was a case of sources being added to support the family unit. It made sense. The sources were correct. Shoot.

That means the problem was me.

Or rather, my grandmother AND the 10 people who used this man to join the DAR.

Yes, Joseph was a patriot. My grandmother's supplemental patriot. One I really hadn't investigated since it had been approved by the DAR. Oh, I would have gotten around to it eventually - but he wasn't a high priority.

Until now.

I am a tenacious researcher. I see a problem and I must fix it. Dog with a bone kind of thing. Funny in a way, not so much to those outside the inner sanctum. (aka husband). I can easily look (and act) like Gary Bussey after untold hours in the Cave. Babbling about stuff and nonsense to the unenlightened. (aka: see above)

So I dug in.

First stop the DAR website. I can't share the actual images, but I can tell you that there are 2 patriots named Joseph Rowley. (DAR Disclaimer: The databases contain DAR proprietary information which should under no circumstances be redistributed to others; assembled or collected for purposes other than DAR membership or for citation in genealogical scholarship; or reproduced, published or posted in any form whatsoever.) One, my grandmother's patriot, Joseph Rowley #A099328; the other? Joseph Langrill Rowley #A210894. You can look for yourself here. If you look at the descendants list for each application you will begin to see the same confusion that I had.

Hoo boy.

Seems somebody's got some 'splainin' to do.

And, to make it MORE confusing (because, why not?) Both men we born in Colchester, CT! One in 1750 the other in 1752. They were listed as dying in different states, in different years and the service records were completely different, they were certainly different men, and it's highly unlikely they were brothers. Cousins?

There is only one DAR application associated with Joseph Langrill Rowley. This application shows his wife to be the same as the FamilySearch entry that started this whole thing.

The other Joseph has 10 applications associated with him, including my grandmother's. Some show his name as Joseph, some show Joseph L while others show Joseph Langrill. The SAR applications are even more confusing - let's just not go there ....

What to do?

Put aside all previous research! Start over. Start with what I know.

1) Joseph Rowley (A099328) b. 1752 Colchester CT d. 12/23/1835 Victor, NY m. (1) Sibbel Fox (2) Hannah Loveland; Service: Mass. Rank: Private, Pension #: SR9051V

2) Joseph Langrill Rowley (A210894) b. 4/16/1750 Colchester, CT d. 10/1849 Fayette Twp, OH m. Mary Welch; Service: Conn. Rank: Staff Officer, Pension #: S7408

Edith Rowley's Notes
in Pension File 7408
I started two research trees on Ancestry with the above information. I was able to put together Joseph #2's life pretty quickly. There were lots of good records on him, including his complete 35 page pension file (#7408)! And one very interesting document (on page 27) that perhaps started the confusion. Dated 1903, a letter from a  Miss Edith Rowley requesting information for her DAR application. Her letter gave the name, birth/death dates and service history (correctly) of  Joseph #1 - but the Pension Office sent her the service records of  Joseph #2 - or at least filed her letter with the wrong Joseph Rowley! Poor Edith! Was she as confused as I was? (Who knew our boy had a middle name - well, he does now!)

Since I had found Joseph #2's pension so easily* - and read the entire thing through, of course -(*Ancestry actually gave it to me as a hint) I searched within the "U.S., Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900" database for Joseph #1.

Jackpot!

Excerpt From Pension File 9051
There it was in all of it's 52 tattered, dog-eared, glorious pages! THIS was the file Edith was looking for. THIS file explained everything. Well, started to anyway. This file listed both wives, birth dates, death dates, children's names - every place Joseph had lived his entire life! Entire life! I read those 52 pages three times, I'll read them again ... (and yes, they are safely downloaded to my computer - and my back-up) Seems there was quite a stink over widow's rights, the second wife was trying to get death benefits, lots of court stuff but what a great read!!

Back to the DAR records for a minute. There was a second son listed on two of the applications, eight of the records used my 4th great grandfather, but two used his brother. This brother was not listed in the pension records, but not all the grown children were. I added him to the new tree and man did things explode!

Sideways research is my new best friend. Collateral research has solved more 'brick walls' for me in the last few years than I can count on one hand. (they are, after all 'brick walls')

Turns out this guy, Jireh Rowley, was an early pioneer of Will County Illinois and much was written about him. Through him I was able to discover his father Joseph #1's parents, found Joseph's birth record (it was actually 1753) and, ultimately linked the whole thing together.

Joseph and Joseph Langrill were second cousins!

As I began to put the trees together, the farther back I was able to get the more familiar the names were getting. Turns out Joseph and Joseph Langrill shared a great grandfather. Their grandfathers were brothers. I had most of it right, but a two generation chunk was diverted. Like a detour. I think I blame the Pension Office for giving the wrong records to Edith back in 1903.

But it's all good now.

And I'm still related to Edward Fuller* - x2 now!

AND, when I got my Ancestry tree corrected - my DNA hints started to make sense for this line.

Happy dance in the Cave!

(Personal disclaimer: this is the Cliff Notes version - it took a while longer, with many fits and starts, to get it sorted! Still a work in progress - I've got a date with the American Ancestors database in the very near future!)


Grandma's Patriot Pin - Oh oh, wrong guy!

Rowley GENEALOGY

*Edward Fuller is Joseph #1's 4th great grandfather through his grandfather's line ... AND his 3rd great grandfather through his grandmother's line. Much has been written about the descendants of Edward Fuller. 



1) Moses Rowley Jr (1634 - 1735)  - - - - -  Mary (1650 - 1713)

among the children, two sons:

     ► 2a) John Rowley Sr (1690 - 1762) m. Deborah Fuller - they had:

               3a) John Rowley Jr (1727 - ?) m. Rebecca Hurd (Brainard) - they had:

                    *4a) Joseph Rowley - Patriot A099328
                        b. 6/15/1753 Colchester CT d. 12/23/1835 Victor, NY
                        m. 5/29/1773 Sibbel Fox (b. 1749 d. 5/8/1784)
                        m. 2/9/1785 Hannah Loveland (b. ?  d. 12/25/1847)


    ► 2b) Moses Rowley III (1679 - 1735) m. Martha Porter - they had:
       
               3b) Daniel Rowley (1719 - ?) m. Bethial Langrill - they had:

                    4b) Joseph Langrill Rowley - Patriot A210894
                      b. 4/16/1750 Colchester, CT d. 10/1849 Fayette Twp, OH
                      m. UNK (b. ? d. 1788/98)
                      m. Mary Welch (b. 4/8/1766 - d. ?)


So. There it is. Two Joseph Rowleys, two Patriots. The two men turned out to be second cousins. Mystery solved.


Now to figure out where these Patriots are buried.....


Research is never "done"!! 



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved




Thursday, March 16, 2017

Video Of The Week: Everything you need to know about Irish family history records


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!









©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | James Fraser and Mary Buckley

38. James Fraser (John - 11, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born July 13th 1836


married May 6th 1879


Mary Buckley born October 25th 1852 Essex, England


children of this union:


i. John Duncan Buckley Fraser b. March 24th 1880

ii. Thomas Brown Lovat Fraser b. October 14th 1881


Neither James' nor Mary's deaths are recorded


note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.



~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Gabriel Houston {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

Gabriel Houston (Sarah, James, William) was born May 25th 1798 in Middletown, Orange Co, New York. He was the third child and first son born to Sarah Faulkner and Thomas Houston.

Gabriel married Susan Ann Owen January 25th 1821 in Goshen, Orange Co, New York. Susan was the daughter of Isaac H Owen And Abigail Wisner.

Shortly after their marriage Gabriel and Susan Ann removed to Sussex Co, New Jersey where Gabriel was a businessman and farmer. The family resided on the Owen Homestead.

The couple had the following children: (all born Sussex Co, New Jersey)

  • Sarah Ann Houston b. 30 Jun 1822 d. 8 Jun 1858 m. Festus Hathaway Vail
  • Abigail Jane Houston b. 2 Apr 1824 d. 11 Jun 1891
  • Isaac Owen Houston b. 7 Feb 1826 d. 9 Feb 1826
  • Thomas E Houston b. 5 Oct 1827 d. 17 Jun 1862 m. Araminta Fleet
  • Erminda Houston b. 1 Apr 1830 d. 1 May 1833
  • Gabriel Wisner Houston b. 28 Mar 1832 d. 24 Feb 1911
  • Henry Owen Houston b. 10 May 1834 d. 5 Aug 1894 m. Harriet Hindes
  • Elizabeth W Houston b. 3 Apr 1836 d. 26 Jan 1840
  • James Nelson Houston b. 22 Apr 1838 d. 1921
  • Elizabeth Houston b. 1839 d. UNK
  • Susan Houston b. 8 Jan 1841 d. 19 Jan 1841
  • Susan Amelia Houston b. 28 Aug 1842 d. UNK m. Thomas Pickens
  • Philip L Houston b. 13 Jun 1844 d. 24 Dec 1872
  • Mary Ophelia Houston b. 24 Apr 1848 d. 1938

Gabriel Houston died January 22nd 1864 in Sussex Co, New Jersey. His wife Susan Ann Owen Houston died on December 15th 1878 also in Sussex Co, New Jersey. There is a large family burial plot in Warwick Cemetery, Orange Co, New York where their names appear on a large monument. The monument lists many of the children presumed buried there as well, however some of the children it has been discovered, are recorded on the monument but buried elsewhere.




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, March 13, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Nine


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!

The Twining Papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.


Twining Story, cont.

This week I'll will share with you some pages from an account book of Edward Wolcott Twining. I don't know what ever became of the book - my grandmother had transcribed this - as follows:

1840 - - - - 8 lb. cheese - - - - .50
Sept. - - - - 3 "    butter - - - - .25
Oct.  - - - - 2 "     "        - - - - .16

1846
Sept.        2 1/2 lb. candles     .25
Oct.         15 lb. salt               .15
 "             34 lb. flour             .51
Nov.        51 lb.   flour           .76
"              1 bu. corn              .18 3/4

Sept.       1 bu. potatos               .18 3/4
Nov.       2 fowls                        .12 1/2
 "            9 1/2 lb. buckwheat    .15
Dec.       19 lb. flour                  .28 1/2
 "            18 1/4 lb. beef            .54 3/4
Mch.      5 lb. venison               .30
 "            1 bu. potatos               .25
 "            4 lb. coffee                 .50
Nov.       1 load wood               .50

Received on table expenses up to second quarterly meeting - $8.14 1/2
 "    "        in produce to second meeting                               -  $4.86 1/2

 "  "         in cash                                                                        $1.75
 "  "          " missionary money                                                  $30.00


Almira - infant (of E.W.T. & A. Twining) deceased (born 28th Oct 1842)
Oct 21 1843 - 9th hour - nine o'clock morny - aged 11 mo. 24 da.   

Birth of children:
Adaline Tennet was born Sept. 12 A.D. 1840
          (died March 13, 1848 at five o'clock morning)
Almira Twining was born October 28, A.D. 1842
           (died Oct. 21, 1843 nine o'clock morning)
Edward Thomas Twining was born August 5, A.D. 1844
Josepth Fenimore Twining was born Sept. 27, 1846
           (dec. Dec. 23 A.D. 1847 - 25 min before 9 o'clock)
             infant of E.W. & A. Twining

Lauriston Twining was born June 10, A.D. 1848
Jesse Lewis was born August 8, A.D. 1850

  1853                 For General Expenses
Oct 17              1 washboard        .35
                         1 basket               .30
"    20              repairing boiler     .30
                         for oats                .50
"    29               steel pens             .05
Nov. 12            boots                  3.00
Dec. 14            brush & comb     .75
                         snuffers              .15
"      17              muslin              3.10
                   pants for Edward   1.30
                      boys clothes        2.00
Jan. 14       teapot, bucket etc.  1.25
Mch.            coat for Edward   1.00
"     29     clothing for family  17.00
July 12  ~to Washington          1.50

1853          ACCOUNT BOOK
Oct.             flour             1.25
                    butter            .60
                   fresh pork      .35
                    sugar            1.15
                  wood             1.50
          potato & cabbage  1.60
                molasses            .35
                 candles             .15
                1 fowl                .10
                    beef               .50
Nov.          eggs                 .20
               tea & candles     .35
               for bread            .30
               milk & butter     .50
                 beef  7 lb.         .42
             matches & bread  .40
                flour                  .40
                 rice                  .16
                tallow               .75
             sweet potatos    1.00

note:
  (received note of various citizens and noted payments on) 

             expenses for collection note

Horse took to pasture May the 19th


~~~~~ end of notations ~~~~~


 
.....................to be continued.................                        




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Brick Wall Ancestor | #1 Sarah Kniffin Vredenburgh


We all have them! Those stubborn ancestors that refuse to come out of hiding. No matter how much coaxing we do! Well, I think it's time to bring them out of the shadows - put their redacted story out there - another piece of the puzzle could be lurking just around the (cyber) corner, in someone's basement, or closet, or sitting in a box on a book shelf ...... You never, ever know where that loose chink will manifest, the one that allows you to push out one brick, then the next. Food for thought. So without further ado....

Brick Wall Ancestor #1 Sarah Kniffin Vredenburgh

Sarah Kniffin
(or Sniffen, Niffin, etc) was born in Westchester County, New York in July of 1792. This we know from the date on her headstone. She died September 16th 1870, aged 78y 1m 28d. That would put her birth about July 19th or 20th 1792. IF the numbers and dates are correct. Who supplied the information for the gravestone?

As to her maiden name? Well, my grandmother recorded it as 'Niffin' saying her family was from Holland. In the Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois (see Hackaliah Vredenburgh) it is reported that her maiden name was 'Kniffin'.

Sarah married Hackaliah Vredenburgh (another brick wall and winner of best ancestor name) from Westchester County, New York sometime around 1810/11. Her first child was born Novemeber 16th 1812 in New York.

Scouring the census records for 1800/1810 in Westchester County NY brings little result. Searching for 'Kniffin' and it's variations returns 20 likely candidates with females in the household of the appropriate age. Well shoot. The returns for 'Vredenburgh' are slightly better - 9 households with males in the appropriate age range. None of the couple's children bear names similar to any of the men on the census.

An odd mention in The New York Genealogical And Biographical Record vol 37, issue 1, pg 6, pub date 1906, in an article titled: Vital Records Of Christ's Church At Rye, Westchester County, New York shows widow Sniffen's 9 children were being baptized. The whole thing is very coincidental. The entry says this Sarah was an adult, but look at the date! July 22, 1792. This particular entry has puzzled me for some time.




Sarah Kniffin Vredenburgh was a preacher's wife, and as such was called upon to travel. After her second child was born the young family uprooted and headed for the wilderness of the Indiana Territory where Hackaliah was assigned as an itinerant Methodist minister. From one memoir written of that time: "Most of Bro. Vredenburg’s itinerant life was spent in the Valley of the Wabash. From its mouth almost to its source he preached, organizing new societies and circuits, carrying the Gospel messages to the scattering settlements, and enduring all the exposures and privations of pioneer life. In one of his charges no house could be had to shelter his wife and children while he traveled his circuit of three or four hundred miles round. Rather than leave his work, he took possession of a deserted log stable, and fitting it up with his own hands made that the parsonage for the year. At other times he was compelled on his rest days to cultivate a small piece of ground to supply his family with food, the pittance received from the people being barely sufficient to furnish them with clothing." Wow.

In all Sarah would give birth to 3 daughters and 5 sons. In the wilderness. In a log stable. Dang.

The children were:

  • Mary b. 1812 New York
  • Caleb b. 1815 New York
  • Rhoda Ann b. 1818 Indiana
  • Samuel Hamilton b. 1829 Indiana
  • Lucy Jane b. 1823 Indiana
  • Jesse D b. 1832 Indiana
  • John C b. 1835 Indiana
  • Unnamed Male b. UNK

Between 1850 and 1860 Sarah and Hackaliah removed to Danville, Illinois. Hackaliah died in 1869, Sarah followed a year later. The couple's final resting place is the Spring Hill Cemetery in Danville. 

Happily (maybe) I am a direct female descendant of Sarah. Which means my mtDNA is her mtDNA. I took the test in January. My haplogroup is U2e1d. Which means Sarah's haplogroup is U2e1d. Which means maybe, just maybe, we can start to chink away at this wall .....
 

...........to be continued...........



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, March 11, 2017

Book Of The Week: Encyclopedia of the History of St Louis



Encyclopedia of the History of St. Louis: A Compendium of History and Biography for Ready Reference, Volume 3, Part 2

William Hyde, Howard Louis Conard
Southern History Company, 1899 - Saint Louis (Mo.)




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, March 10, 2017

Fearless Females 2017 :: Week 1




Favorite female ancestor:
Do you have a favorite female ancestor? One you are drawn to or want to learn more about? Write down some key facts you have already learned or what you would like to learn and outline your goals and potential sources you plan to check.

I have many favorite ancestors, the women seem harder to follow because there are so few records for them. So many have just one name, their maiden surnames lost to time. Right now I am stuck on my 2nd great grandmother, Jennie (Jane) Whitford. Twice divorced, I recently discovered a half brother to my great grandfather that no one knew about (on either side of the family). Her burial location remains a mystery. I'd like to learn more of her life prior to her marriage to my 2nd great grandfather. Who her parents were, why she divorced two times and where she is buried. She was last alive in St Paul, MN in 1887.

Photo:
Post a photo of one of your female ancestors. Who is in the photo? When was it taken? Why did you select this photo?

This is a photo of my paternal grandmother (far right) with who I think are her three girlfriends. The back of the photo just says Butte Aug 15,1922. My grandmother must have taken a train trip with her friends. This was a month before her 20th birthday. She lived in Chicago all her life. I love this photo for many reasons. One, I never knew this woman, she died when my dad was just 16, so all I have of her are a few photos. And two, it looks like they are having fun - I have always wanted to take a train trip across the US myself.




Name:
Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

I do!! I am named for my paternal great grandmother Anna Elizabeth O'Connell Faulkner. My middle name, Elizabeth, is a traditional name used in my family. On both sides. Both my grandmother's, my mother, and a maternal great grandmother all share Elizabeth.

Marriage Records:
Do you have marriage records for your grandparents or great-grandparents? Write a post about where they were married and when. Any family stories about the wedding day? Post a photo too if you have one.

No photos. I have some marriage records - the ones I was able to find on Ancestry and FamilySearch. Oddly, no family stories either. My paternal grandparents wedding was always, always a mystery. As I said above, my paternal grandmother died a month before my dad's (an only) 16th birthday. My paternal grandfather never spoke of her after that. My dad really didn't know much - he knew they were married before he was born, guessing sometime between 1926 and 1930.  Last year, 9 years after my dad's passing, I decided to relook at this mystery. You can read about my discovery here - long story short they were married in Chicago on Oct 2nd 1928. I plan to visit the church sometime this summer.

How did your grandparents meet?
How did they meet? You’ve documented marriages, now, go back a bit. Do you know the story of how your parents met? Your grandparents?

My parents met in college at the University of Illinois. A frat party I believe. My maternal grandparents were High School sweethearts. My grandmother's parents were also school sweethearts, maintaining a long distance relationship for two years while my great grandfather was away at University.

Heirloom:
 Describe an heirloom you may have inherited from a female ancestor (wedding ring or other jewelry, china, clothing, etc.) If you don’t have any, then write about a specific object you remember from your mother or grandmother, or aunt (a scarf, a hat, cooking utensil, furniture, etc.)

I do have several pieces of jewelry that belonged to my maternal grandmother, the wedding china that belonged to my paternal grandmother and my mother's wedding dress, but my absolute favorite heirloom is this painting, painted by my grandmother's mother Carrie Elizabeth Twining Potwin (see there, Elizabeth!) It has passed from woman to woman in my family and the cool part? Every owner was an Elizabeth! I love that story!



Favorite Recipe:
Share a favorite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

Oh lord no! I do not come from a line of good cooks. My step-step-step (yes, three steps) grandmother was an amazing baker, but direct line cooks? Not so much. My aunt's 'famous' desert was vanilla ice cream smothered in Creme De Menthe! For everyone! We did have some memorable Thanksgivings when I was a young child .....

Letter Collection:
Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.

I have a few letters that my grandmother wrote to her mother when she was living in Canada in the late 1930's. My grandfather had been relocated for his job so the entire family made the move from Iowa to New Brunswick. My mother was born in Canada. This is an excerpt from a letter my grandmother wrote to her mother after my mom was born:

"Thursday afternoon October first. Dearest Mother and all, you won't mind pencil I know. I'm back in bed having been up twice today (for the first) Of course I was a bit giddy at first but felt alright the second time. Wish you might see our little girl, she is very wee - today she weighs five pounds and thirteen ounces. She may tomorrow have her birth weight back. I have a very good nurse and we've gotten along fine. She will stay until Saturday or possibly Sunday. I am to go downstairs on Sat." ..... 

My mother was born on September 21st. It sounds to me as if my grandmother had not been out of bed until this day, the first of October! Oh my, how the times have changed!


....................until next week................



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Video Of The Week: GEDMatch Basics


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Gilbert Fraser and Mary Cargill

37. Gilbert Fraser (John - 11, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born December 15th 1829


married November 21st 1856 Arbroath, Scotland


Mary Cargill born February 4th 1834



children of this union: (all born Arbroath, Scotland)


i. John Cargill Fraser b. October 18th 1857

ii. Gilbert Fraser b. September 24th 1859

iii. William S Fraser b. March 24th 1861

iv. Mary C Fraser b.  August 3rd 1862 d. November 16th 1863

v. James Winton Fraser b.  March 9th 1864

vi. Charles Fraser b. November 7th 1865

vii. Reginold Fraser b. December 20th 1868

viii. Ann Simpson Fraser b. December 7th 1870


Gilbert Fraser died March 31st 1871. Mary Cargill Fraser's death is unrecorded.


note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Harriet Houston {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

Harriet Houston (Sarah, James, William) was born August 25th 1794 in Middletown, then Ulster Co, New York. She was the second child, and second daughter, born to Sarah Faulkner and her husband Thomas Houston. 

Harriet married John B Booth December 30th 1817 in Goshen, Orange Co, New York. John was a Presbyterian minister. 

The couple had the following children: (all born Goshen, Orange Co, New York)


  • Thomas Houston Booth b. 1819 d. 12 Jun 1872 m. Maria Smith
  • Ellen 'Elenor' Booth b. 21 Oct 1820 d. 5 Feb 1873 Iowa
  • Edwin Booth b. 27 Oct 1821 d. 12 Dec 1845 "at sea"
  • Sarah Jane Booth b.19 Mar 1823 d. UNK Iowa m. William Tell Wynkoop
  • Mary Ann Booth b. 30 Apr 1825 d. 10 Mar 1895 Iowa
  • Harriet Houston Booth b. 4 Aug 1827 d. 12 Sep 1902 Iowa
  • Susan Agnes Booth b. 1829 d. 10 Jun 1880 m. Lawrence Millar M.D.
  • Infant Booth b. abt 1832 d. 17 Jun 1833 New York
  • Catherine Booth b. 2 Aug 1834 d. UNK Iowa m. John P Conkey

Harriet and John removed from their long time home in Goshen, Orange Co, New York in the decade between 1850 and 1860 and relocated to Bellevue, Jackson Co, Iowa. They were both in their late 50's or early 60's.

Harriet Houston Booth died April 8th 1868 her husband John Booth died February 18th 1869. They are buried in the First Presbyterian Cemetery in Bellevue, Iowa with their children Elenor, Edwin, Mary Ann, Harriet, and Susan Booth Millar.



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, March 6, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Eight


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!

The Twining Papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.


Twining Story, cont.

Edward Wolcott Twining, son of Lewis and Jennett, b. 1814 Tolland, MA, d. 1897 Corning, IA. Edward's second wife, Priscilla B Ashby was the mother of  Jessie Lewis. The family was living in Washington, IA (1850). Edward took a literary course at Ohio University and a theological course at Lane Seminary. The later during Lyman Beecher's time. Edward's sister Mrs. Rose raised him after the death of his parents. He entered [the] Methodist ministry in 1840 in Iowa where [he] continued for forty years. He came west in a covered wagon; by boat up the Ohio river. 

More about EDWARD WOLCOTT TWINING:
He was an itinerant Methodist minister. His people came from Cape Cod, MA. They came to the state of Ohio. His sister Almira and husband Rev. Rose raised him after his parents' deaths. Edward married Adeline Weed and while he was in Tipton (now Iowa City) IA she died. A year and a half [later] he married again (Priscilla B Ashby) he and second wife moved to Des Moines, IA before it was the county seat. Fort Des Moines was (is) at the fork of the rivers, Des Moines and Mississippi. There were soldiers stationed there to protect the people from the Indians. The town was along the river. In later years Bess and Nett [granddaughters] used to visit their grandparents from their home in Corning, IA. They used to see covered wagons coming across the prairie while they were at play. The single seated buggies in those days had seats underneath for children.

Edward Wolcott, at the 'express' age of 84 died in his home in Corning, IA. He was born in Tolland, MA October 5, 1814 and in 1815 came to Granville, OH, where he lived until he was 12 years old. After boyhood education he attended Ohio University and theological courses at Lane Seminary during Lyman Beecher's connection with that institution. In spring of 1847 he came to Muscatine, IA where he engaged in teaching. He commenced his career as Methodist itinerant (Richmond Circuit) January 3, 1848; ordination as Deacon at hands of Bishop Morris at the Iowa conference. Edward was married in 1849 was sent to Washington, IA. He was ordained 1850 elder by Bishop Hamiline (August). His lists of appointments included - 1850-53 Marion and Cedar Rapids - 1853-54 Iowa City - 1854-56 Des Moines - 1856-57, supernumerary; 1857-61 presiding elder of Muscatine district - 1861-63 Lexington circuit, 1863-65 Muscatine circuit. He then retired [and] moved to Corning, IA where he lived the rest of his life. He was associated with the location and founding of Corning College at Mt Vernon and personally secured the 'first noble teacher'. He was a great and inspirational leader and a friend of all. His interest in the missions never lagged. 

[As] a wedding fee Rev. E. W. Twining was given a portrait - written in longhand the 'Emancipation Proclamation' forming the head and shoulders of Abraham Lincoln. This was executed by an instructor of penmanship.

Two weddings were documented in a account book:

 Married 1869:

Anthony A Geoss to Martha I Talbot
March 28, 1869

Calvin Folier to Lucinda DeLeonce
March 24, 1869


GENEALOGY

Edward Wolcott Twining b. 10/5/1814
                                         d. 5/24/1897
                                         m. 2/3/1840 to Adeline Weed (1st)
                                                                  b. UNK d. 1/3/1848
                                         m. 8/28/1849 to Priscilla B Ashby (2nd)
                                                       daughter of Jesse Ashby and Elizabeth Hays Wilson
                                                                  b. 7/18/1817
                                                                  d. 9/2/1911


children:

(with Adeline)

Jennett died in infancy
Almira died in infancy
Fenimore died in infancy
Edward T (M.D.) b. 8/5/1844 d. 1/17/1929 m. to Florence Conger (1) S L (2) Drucilla Merrill (3)
Lauriston b. 6/7/1845 d. 5/31/1895 m. to Laura Botkin


(with Priscilla)

Jesse Lewis b. 8/5/1850 d. 4/7/1933 m. 10/25/1876 to Flora Dell Rowley




.................to be continued......................



***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. ***



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Field Notes: Genealogy's Plasticity (and why you're never really done)



Plasticity: (noun) The capability of being molded, receiving shape, or being made to assume a desired form.

This is a two edged sword. It means we can revisit our previous research, make corrections and move on. It also means if we are new to genealogy, uneducated or careless we can, in the span of a rainy afternoon, create a fanciful monster of a family tree that takes on a life of it's own; and ultimately gets abandoned to the infiniteness of the cloud.

We've all seen our fair share of the second. I'd like to talk about the first. The ability to modify our research as more information becomes available. This falls loosely into the "my genealogy is finished" trap. Genealogy is never "finished". So-called 'brick walls' are not eternal dead ends. IF your genealogy is 'finished' then you have made the decision to be 'finished'. And that's fine. Some of us do not want to allow the pursuit of ancestors to consume our lives. (I know, hard to believe!) Sometimes  the reason for 'doing genealogy' is merely to learn who a particular ancestor was, a soldier or pilgrim perhaps.

I began thinking about this placticity as I was looking at my grandmother's work. She dedicated the last 30 years of her life to daily research. I doubt she was ready to 'go quietly into that good night', instead pleading that she wasn't finished yet! (Somehow, I think that will be me as well) She had made great headway in putting together our family tree. Writing letters, traveling to repositories, archives, libraries and museums, ferreting out all the documents she was able. She logged her research.  She was able to gain entry into both the DAR and the Colonial Dames. She went as far as she was able, with the resources available to her at the time. In the end what was left was an almost complete 5 generation maternal branch with a few surnames reaching back several more generations. Her paternal branch was more challenging. She was able to complete 3 generations but, with the exception of her maiden surname line, the rest of the tree was a big fat nothing. She had little success on her husband's line as well.

I inherited 'good bones' in her research and when I began to scratch my own genealogical itch I did, in the beginning, bump into her brick walls. At first I had the same difficulty, feeling I could go no further. This was in the late 1980's and early 1990's. She had exhausted all the resources available to us at the time. I took to writing letters and pouring over books at the library. And ultimately setting aside the big box of research and pursuing other things.

Two things happened to pull me back. The internet appeared, and along with it the first forums, data and resource pages and online trees! Like a choir of angels, a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, a whole new, bright and shiny way to research! The forums were a-buzz, information was being shared, cousins were being found and new friendships were formed. I dabbled, poked and lurked. I purchased my first family tree software - it came on 5 1/4 floppys - Family Tree Maker stone age edition, I think.

I pulled out the box of research and started anew.

The second thing was the death of my father, and the discovery of his 'operation grampa' research. Seems he had been trying to learn more about his grandfather, who had died a year before he was born. From that discovery a quest was born. Now known as 'Finding Faulkner', this was the research that I cut my eye-teeth on. That kicked my butt, left me crying, and ultimately showed me that there is really no such thing as a brick wall.

The Finding Faulkner experience instilled great confidence in me to relook at my grandmother's 40 year old research. What she had considered 'done' or 'unfindable' I took as a new challenge. The resources available to us now are light-years ahead of what she had to work with - heck, computer software alone puts things in a whole new perspective. Using the FAN technique and collateral research I was able to get beyond where my grandmother had left off. I have been able to disprove some long held beliefs with the discovery of hard evidence, incorporating the GPS to verify my findings.

Plasticity.

And why your genealogy is never, ever really 'done'.

In the years since I took a serious and responsible approach to solving the mystery that is my family tree I have broken brick walls, proved/disproved names, dates, and locations, found 'unfindable' female ancestors, rewritten some of my grandmothers 'facts' - heck, rewritten some of my own 'facts'! I've uncovered first marriages and step children, put parents with children, removed children from parents, digging ever deeper. Adding DNA into the research mix is bound to open even more doors in the future.

It's an exciting time in the genealogical world - I am sad neither my father nor my grandmother are here to experience this new age. I hope I will have someone to pass my work along to, and I especially hope that she (or he) will take it farther still, break more brick walls, change some of my conclusions, rewrite the family story and refine it further.

So, what are you waiting for? There's more to your story and always more to be found! I love this graphic, the gal on the right is sure her genealogy is 'done' - she only sees the surface, but the guy on the left? He knows what he sees are only the tips of those icebergs! Too bad he's not suiting up in his diving gear ....

Be the guy on the left.

Consider the possibility of new and different conclusions. Have an ongoing goal of continuous progress.

Embrace plasticity.



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of the Town of Mason, N.H.



History of the Town of Mason, N.H.: From the First Grant in 1749, to the Year 1858

John Boynton Hill
L.A. Elliot, 1858 - Mason (N.H.) - 324 pages




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, March 3, 2017

The 2017 Fearless Females Blog Writing Challenge


2017 FEARLESS FEMALES BLOGGING CHALLENGE

Lisa Alzo on her The Accidental Genealogist blog has run a "Fearless Female" blog writing challenge every March since 2010. From her blog:


"In March 2010, I launched a series of 31 blogging prompts for celebrating and honoring the "fearless females" in our family trees. Many bloggers participated and I was asked if I planned on running them again. I'm happy to say that this series is still going strong and is back for another year.

The theme for National Women's History Month 2017 is “Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business” so it is a perfect time to start writing about those hardworking and trailblazing female ancestors who have informed, influenced, or inspired you!

While I won't be posting individual prompts each day, I will be sharing some of my own favorite posts I wrote for the series. Also, watch this blog for other ideas, prompts, and tips to learn about your female ancestors, as well as special coupons for discounts on books, courses, or other products related to researching your female lines."


I wanted to participate last year but life got in the way, so this year I will try again! I plan to do a weekly mash-up of the prior week's prompts. This should be fun!! Watch this space for the next 4 weeks, let's see how this shakes out.


THE PROMPTS
(you can find links for some of the prompt suggestions over at Lisa's blog)

 March 1 Do you have a favorite female ancestor? One you are drawn to or want to learn more about? Write down some key facts you have already learned or what you would like to learn and outline your goals and potential sources you plan to check.

March 2 — Post a photo of one of your female ancestors. Who is in the photo? When was it taken? Why did you select this photo?

March 3 — Do you share a first name with one of your female ancestors? Perhaps you were named for your great-grandmother, or your name follows a particular naming pattern. If not, then list the most unique or unusual female first name you’ve come across in your family tree.

March 4 — Do you have marriage records for your grandparents or great-grandparents? Write a post about where they were married and when. Any family stories about the wedding day? Post a photo too if you have one.

March 5 — How did they meet? You’ve documented marriages, now, go back a bit. Do you know the story of how your parents met? Your grandparents?

March 6 — Describe an heirloom you may have inherited from a female ancestor (wedding ring or other jewelry, china, clothing, etc.) If you don’t have any, then write about a specific object you remember from your mother or grandmother, or aunt (a scarf, a hat, cooking utensil, furniture, etc.)

March 7 — Share a favorite recipe from your mother or grandmother’s kitchen. Why is this dish your favorite? If you don’t have one that’s been passed down, describe a favorite holiday or other meal you shared with your family.

March 8 — Did one of your female ancestors leave a diary, journal, or collection of letters? Share an entry or excerpt.
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March 9 — Take a family document (baptismal certificate, passenger list, naturalization petition, etc.) and write a brief narrative using the information.

March 10 — What role did religion play in your family? How did your female ancestors practice their faith? If they did not, why didn’t they? Did you have any female ancestors who served their churches in some capacity?

March 11 — Did you have any female ancestors who died young or from tragic or unexpected circumstances? Describe and how did this affect the family?

March 12 — Working girl: Did your mother or grandmother work outside the home? What did she do? Describe her occupation.

March 13 — Moment of Strength: share a story where a female ancestor showed courage or strength in a difficult situation.

March 14 — Newsmakers? Did you have a female ancestor who made the news? Why? Was she famous or notorious? Did she appear in the social column?

March 15 — Write a six-word memoir tribute to one of your female ancestors.

March 16 — If you could have lunch with any female family member (living or dead) or any famous female who would it be and why? Where would you go? What would you eat?
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March 17 — Social Butterfly? What social organizations or groups did your mother or grandmother belong to? Sewing circle, church group, fraternal benefit society or lodge? Describe her role in the group.

March 18 — Shining star: Did you have a female ancestor who had a special talent? Artist, singer, actress, athlete, seamstress, or other? Describe.

March 19 — Have you discovered a surprising fact about one of your female ancestors? What was it and how did you learn it? How did you feel when you found out?

March 20 — Is there a female ancestor who is your brick wall? Why? List possible sources for finding more information.

March 21 — Describe a tender moment one of your female ancestors shared with you or another family member.

March 22 — If a famous director wanted to make a movie about one of your female ancestors who would it be? What actress would you cast in the role and why?

March 23 — Create a timeline for a female ancestor using your favorite software program or an online timeline generator such as OurTimelines. Post an image of it or link to it.

March 24 — Do you share any physical resemblance or personality trait with one of your female ancestors? Who? What is it?
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March 25 — Tell how a female ancestor interacted with her children. Was she loving or supportive? A disciplinarian? A bit of both?

March 26 — What education did your mother receive? Your grandmothers? Great-grandmothers? Note any advanced degrees or special achievements.

March 27 — Do you know the immigration story of one or more female ancestors? Do you have any passenger lists, passports, or other documentation? Interesting family stories?

March 28 — Do you remember your mother’s best friend? Your grandmother’s? How and where did they meet? How long were they friends? What activities did they share?

March 29 — Create a free Fold3 Memorial Page or a Genealogy Trading Card at Big Huge Labs for a female ancestor. Some of you may have created your own card back in September 2009 following Sheri Fenley’s post over at The Educated Genealogist. This time, the card is for your female ancestor. Tell us about who you've selected and why and then post a link to what you've created.

March 30 — Did you receive any advice or words of wisdom from your mother or another female ancestor?


March 31 — Pick one female ancestor and write a mini-profile (500 words or less).



2017 Fearless Females Blog Writing Challenge