Saturday, January 20, 2018

Book Of The Week: A Genealogical and Biographical History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania


A Genealogical and Biographical History of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

Thomas Cushing
Genealogical Publishing Company, 1889 - Biography & Autobiography - 786 pages

"Allegheny County in southwestern Pennsylvania was for many years a staging area of westward migration. Thousands of early pioneers passed through it and thousands more stayed. Representatives of many of these early settlers, perhaps the majority, are immortalized in this work in genealogical and biographical sketches. The sketches, numbering approximately 2,250 and naming a total of 50,000 related persons, generally treat subjects who were born in the early nineteenth century, with reference to immediate forebears of the late eighteenth century. The sketches typically mention the date and place of birth and marriage of the principal subject, the place of birth of his parents and often grandparents, sometimes the name of the first ancestor in America, and details of religion, education, military service, occupation, home, and residence"





©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Video Of The Week: Basic Series: Part 3 - Beginning Descendancy Research - James Tanner

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!




©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Daniel W Corwin {Gen 4}



It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Daniel W Corwin (Catherine Houston, Sarah, James, William) was born in Middletown, Orange Co, New York, June 19th 1825, to parents Catherine Houston and David Corwin.

Daniel married Mary Land January 13th 1852 in Wapello Co, Iowa.

The couple had at least two children:

  • Edwin M Corwin b. abt 1854 d. 24 Jan 1900 m. Elizabeth Meyer
  • Fred Land Corwin b. 8 Aug 1856 d. 29 May 1919 m. Frances H Smith

Not much is known about Daniel W Corwin. He was born in Orange Co, New York and at some point before 1852 made his way to Iowa. His father David was in Iowa about this same time. When Daniel died his probate packet contained 108 pages of mostly receipts and monies owed. (You can view it on Ancestry.com with a subscription) I'm unclear as to who all of the debt belonged to. There were many pages that referred to David Corwin, deceased, I suspect Daniel took over his father's debt.  At any rate, there does not seem to be a will. Daniel W Corwin died about 1861 in Eddyville, Mahaska Co, Iowa. He was 36 years old.

Mary Land Corwin died several years later, about 1867. Mary was also 36 years old at the time of her death.

The couple is buried in Highland Cemetery in Eddyville with Daniel's father David.

Much of this family remains a mystery.


©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Saturday, January 13, 2018

Book Of The Week: Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana ...



Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana ...

Lewis, 1899 - Fayette County (Ind.)






©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, January 12, 2018

Tools For The Dig: State Focused Research | Wisconsin



State Focused Research | Wisconsin


Some of my favorite research sites are slightly off-radar by today's definition.

First I'd like to talk about Genealogy Trails. From their homepage: "Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers. We are all about adding data for you to use in researching your family lines!!! We know that what you're looking for is data -- and we have LOTS of it right here.
Our hosts work continuously to bring you fresh, interesting and NEW data (well.... as new as hundred year old data can be!!!)" Pretty much everything you need to know to begin your Wisconsin research is contained within the pages of  Wisconsin Genealogy Trails. This is a thorough, well thought out site - and they are always looking for volunteers!

Companion Yahoo! Group: Genealogy Trails/UpperMidwest

Next up, RAOGK. Another volunteer site. A treasure trove of links, well organized and easy to understand. From this site you can request look-ups from a team of Wisconsin volunteers. Or add you name to the volunteer list if Wisconsin is your home-base.

WIGenWeb is an oldie but a goody! Volunteer based also, this database was founded in 1996! From their home page: "WIGenWeb isn’t an ordinary genealogy website. Ordinary websites are those where text and sometimes pretty pictures are present, but trying to get in touch with a real person to help you with your research… impossible. The strength of WIGenWeb is its many volunteers, some of whom have spent over a decade assisting others with their Wisconsin research. Using our county page visit the Wisconsin county your ancestors lived in and first try and find any information the county may freely provide on their pages (most have some sort of search built in). If the particular fact isn’t available online, then reach out to the county coordinator (cc) and they will try and assist you as best they can. Most county coordinators have their email address available on their website, though some will use contact forms."

Linkpendium is another all around resource hub. So What is Linkpendium, Anyway? "Linkpendium is a 10,000,000+ resource directory to everything on the Web about families worldwide and genealogically-relevant information about U.S. states and counties. We cover both free and subscription sites, with a strong emphasis upon free resources provided by libraries, other government agencies, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals. We are particularly proud of our unique indexes to online biographies."

Cyndi's List Wisconsin page.


FamilySearch:
Wisconsin State Wiki
Wisconsin State Catalog
Wisconsin Online Genealogy Records


State societies and archives include:
Wisconsin State Genealogical Society
Wisconsin Historical Society
Digital State Archives/Wisconsin


A comprehensive list of newspapers can be found at The Ancestor Hunt's Wisconsin page.


For social context look at LOC Wisconsin Collection and State of Wisconsin Digital Collections.

As I discover more resources I'll update this post. Do you have any Wisconsin favorites that I've missed? Please share!


©2018 Anne Faulkner - Ancestor Archaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, January 11, 2018

Video Of The Week: Basic Series: Part 2 - Communicating what you know about your Genealogy ...

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!




©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Susan Amelia Houston {Gen 4}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Susan Amelia Houston (Gabriel Houston, Sarah, James, William) was born in Glenwood, New Jersey August 28th 1842, to parents Gabriel Houston and Susan Ann Owen.

Susan married Thomas Pickens Jr January 16th 1878 at the Glenwood Baptist Church in Sussex Co, New Jersey.

The couple had at least one child:
  • Alfred Houston Pickens b. 29 Jun 1882 d. 24 Jun 1956 m. Anna Margaret Sollner


Thomas Pickens Jr was a merchant in Newburgh, Orange Co, New York.

Susan Amelia Houston Pickens died June 13th 1922 and is buried with many of her siblings, her parents and grandparents in Warwick Cemetery in Warwick, Orange Co, New York.

Thomas Pickens Jr died December 31st 1927 and is buried, according to the Bull Book, in Woodlawn Cemetery in Newburgh, Orange Co, New York.


©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, January 8, 2018

Brick Wall Ancestor | #9 Martha McBride {part 1}


We all have them! Those stubborn ancestors that refuse to come out of hiding. No matter how much coaxing we do! Well, I think it's time to bring them out of the shadows - put their redacted story out there - another piece of the puzzle could be lurking just around the (cyber) corner, in someone's basement, or closet, or sitting in a box on a bookshelf ...... You never, ever know where that loose chink will manifest, the one that allows you to push out one brick, then the next. Food for thought. So without further ado....


Brick Wall Ancestor | #9 Martha McBride part 1

Martha is my 3rd great grandmother. I've written about her before. I presented a sketch of her life, as I could suss out, for my 52 Ancestors project. You can read it here. I called it "Invisible Wife" and she still is! I have not learned more about Martha since that time. But I have a (wild) theory or two ......

The portion of New York state that Martha and family resided in began as Ulster County, was annexed to Orange County in 1798 and further added to the new Sullivan County in 1809. The land and the town names remained the same, only the county changed. Because, fun!

Martha was born about 1789/90, deduced from the recording of her death as "taking place about Christmas time, 1845, when she was probably fifty six years old" (from FindAGrave and other histories) Martha married her husband James Faulkner near Wallkill, Orange Co (previously Ulster Co), New York most likely, as James and family are documented in Wallkill, Ulster/Orange/Sullivan Co, New York as land owners and residents; James being a prominent citizen within the community.  The Faulkners were long-standing Presbyterians and many held positions within the church. Other Faulkner men and women married other McBride men and women around the same time as James Faulkner married Martha McBride.

In 1790 there were only three male heads of household in all of Ulster Co, New York, where Martha was presumed to have been born. Archibald McBride (resides: Mamakating: 3 males under 16, 2 males 16 and over, 4 females any age), James McBride (resides: Montgomery: 3 males under 16, 1 male 16 and over, 3 females any age, 3 slaves) and John McBride (resides: Montgomery: 1 male under 16, 1 male 16 and over, 2 females any age) The 1790 census is really disappointing as it lists only the total number of females in the household, these records reflect the possibility of Martha being in the household of any of these men. So lots of speculation there!

The author of the Bull Family genealogy book theorized that these three men were brothers, their father being James McBride Sr, who came to the area from Ireland about 1728; so which James is on the census? Both James Sr and James Jr were alive in 1790 and residing in Ulster Co. according to this author. I have not found any further documentation to prove/disprove this and surmise there was some confusion interpreting the death records (fodder for a future post)

More digging revealed that James McBride Jr had been married twice. First, to Martha Hill in 1778, who died in 1790 one month prior to the census being taken. The couple could have had at least 5 children together. James remarried in 1792 to Sarah Eager and had at least 3 children with her before he died in 1798. He is buried in Goodwill Cemetery in Montgomery, Orange Co, New York. He will not appear on any future census.

 The 1800 census is a little better, but just as speculative. This census again lists three McBride heads of household but this time Sarah (resides: Montgomery: 1 male under 10, 1 female under 10, 1 females 26 thru 44), James (resides: Montgomery: 2 males under 10, 1 male 16 thru 25, 1 female 16 thru 25, 1 female 26 thru 44) and Archibald (resides: Wallkill: 1 male under 10, 1 male 26 thru 44, 1 female 26 thru 44) appear. Well we know James Jr died in 1798 and the age of the household members does not line up for James Sr, so there might be a son we don't know of yet. Same for Sarah. Sarah McBride was James Jr's second wife and was certainly alive in 1800, but her household only lists two young children, one male and one female. Sarah and James had one daughter and two sons who grew to adulthood, so either one son was not counted or this is not the correct Sarah. That leaves John. The John McBride household could have contained the two children, based on the tally from the 1790 census. Could John have married a Sarah? Could John have died prior to 1800? As for Archibald, the only female listed in 1800 was 26 to 44 years old. Is this the correct Archibald or could this be a son? In that case, where is Archibald from 1790? (put a pin in that)

Other tidbits.

Only James McBride Jr is known to be the son of James Sr. Interestingly, James Jr named his first born son Archibald. Archibald I, James' son (and possibly Martha's brother) married Susan Faulkner, a first cousin of Martha's husband James Faulkner.

It is known that James McBride Jr was a member of the First Presbyterian Church at Goshen. His marriage records can be found on Ancestry dot com. Martha McBride and her husband James Faulkner were Presbyterians.

Oddly, a descendant of Archibald McBride (possible brother of James and John) is a 5th to 8th cousin DNA match with myself and one of my siblings. That would work out to James McBride Sr being our MRCA. (put a pin in that)

Are you taking notes? It gets mighty confusing! Perhaps a flow-chart might help?

A Venn diagram?

A giant detective board with pushpins and string?

So here's my first (wild) theory.  I call it the Theory of James. Looking at the paltry information available, and this in NO WAY concludes anything, this theory postulates that Martha belongs in the James McBride Jr household. Her mother would then have been Martha Hill. Martha Hill died in 1790. Martha McBride was born in 1789 or 1790. Could Martha Hill have died in childbirth? Could James McBride have named his newborn daughter after her deceased mother?

This theory asks the additional questions: where is 10 year old Martha in 1800? Could she be living with other relatives? Grandparents? Aunt or Uncle? In this theory her father died in 1798, leaving her with a step-mother who had three small children of her own to deal with.

So much fuzzy information. Just enough to get one in trouble should one choose to take a hunch and run with it. (don't) Kind of like playing a 230 year old game of 'telephone', the whispers of hazy evidence floating up to confound and confuse.

So, just who WAS Martha McBride's father? And where was she born? And when?


Stay tuned for wild theory #2 ......



©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Saturday, January 6, 2018

Book Of The Week: Biographical and Genealogical History of Morris County, N.J



Biographical and Genealogical History of Morris County, N.J
Lewis Publishing Company, 1899 - Morris County (N.J.)





©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Video Of The Week: Basic Series: Part 1 - Getting Started with FamilySearch Family Tree - J...

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!




©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Henry Owen Houston {Gen 4}



It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Henry Owen Houston (Gabriel Houston, Sarah, James, William) was born in Glenwood, New Jersey May 10th 1834, to parents Gabriel Houston and Susan Ann Owen.

Henry married Harriet Hindes about 1862 in either New Jersey or New York.


The couple had at least two children:
  • Walter Burchard Houston b. 5 Sep 1863 d. 3 Apr 1890 never married
  • Eloise Houston b. 30 Oct 1868 d. 28 Jan 1963 m. James Oliver Clark


Not much is known about Henry Houston other than he was a bookkeeper in Rahway, New Jersey. Henry died August 5th 1894 at the age of 60. His son Walter preceding him in death.

Harriet Hindes Houston lived 6 more years, attending the wedding of her daughter in 1899. Harriet died March 8th 1900, four days after her 64th birthday.

The Houston's are buried in Hazel Wood Cemetery in Rahway, New Jersey with their son Walter.



©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, January 1, 2018

A "Top Ten" Year In Review: 2017

As we close the book on another year I decided to do what many other bloggers do, compile my list of the top ten blog posts published in 2017. I am honored that you have chosen to follow along with my genealogical adventures and read about my research. You have made these ten the most read posts in 2017. 

Without further ado:













Brick walls were popular! But of course who doesn't like the mystery of a brick wall. (Unless you're butting your head against it trying to find a way through)

I admit I started out 2017 with a bang, only to practically fizzle out toward the end of June when Real Life (see post #1) whacked me hard upside the head and it was all I could do to maintain focus on current life events. I lost both my fur-baby sidekicks (and crack genealogy sleuths!) in the span of 4 months this year, which further lessened my will to write.

But 2018 dawns fresh and new and I am resolute to get back in the Cave and soldier on. 

This year I hope to dig deeper into the Faulkner progeny, further explore my grandmother's (the Genealogy Queen) side of the family and expand her research, present more sketches via 52 Ancestors, bust a few more brick walls and visit some ancestral sites. Maybe even stick my toe in the DNA research pool!

Looks like I have my work cut out for me. Hope you'll continue to accompany me on this never-ending adventure. 

Wishing all of us a fortuitous New Year with many happy surprises.

~Anne



©2018 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved