Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Letty Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Letty Faulkner (William, James, William) was born about 1790 in Ulster Co, New York. She was the second daughter born to William Bull Faulkner and his second wife Agnes "Nancy" McWilliams.

Letty married Benjamin Everett, the son of Ephraim Everett and Beulah More, on January 16th 1806 at the First Presbyterian Church in Goshen, NY.

To them were born at least three children, birth years given 1807, 1809 and 1812. Names are UNK.

Letty Faulkner Everett died in 1855. Her burial location is unknown.



Anyone with additional information on this family is encouraged to contact me - I'd love to collaborate with anyone related to or researching them.

©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 27, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Seven


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!


the Twining papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.

Twining Story, cont.

Lewis Twining, son of Elijah, was born in Barnstable, Massachusetts April 11, 1777. He married Jeanette Smith, daughter of Deacon Smith, in Tolland, Massachusetts on April 25, 1800. Their first five children were born in Tolland.

Early in his marriage Lewis sold the property his father gave him in the north part of Tolland for $6000, and in 1815 moved to Granville, Ohio where their youngest child was born. Lewis invested in land and water privileges, which at his death was all lost through an avaricious creditor. The dam was afterward swept away and the land covered with gravel and dirt, so it was never after cultivated.

He was a large supporter of the Presbyterian church.


GENEALOGY

Lewis Twining Sr b. 4/11/1777
                           d. 7/18/1821
                           m. 4/25/1800 to Jeanette Smith
                                                   daughter of Deacon Smith
                                                        b. 1/4/1780
                                                        d. 11/6/1827


children:

Almira b. 11/12/1803 d. 12/20/1883 m. 3/31/1826  to Rev. Samuel Rose
Lewis Jr b. 8/14/1805 d. 7/4/1821
Merrick S b. 7/13/1807 d. UNK m. to Corintha Clark
Lauriston b. 11/9/1809 d. 2/20/1841 m. 3/20/1831 to Mary Robinson
Edward Wolcott b. 10/5/1814 d. 5/21/1897 m. (1) 2/3/1840 to Adelia Weed (2) 9/28/1849 to Priscilla B Ashby
Darius N b. 2/11/1818 d. 5/1/1820




.................to be continued......................



***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. *** 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, February 26, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: And Then There Were Three!

It happened!!

Last week!

A third tree has surfaced!

As you may recall, I originally believed I was in possession of a unique document, an original one-of-a-kind Family Tree for the Duncan Fraser ~ Isobel Burness union.

Then, my research illuminated the truth that there were at least two others out there - one I found mention of on an old (1999) chat log on RootsWeb - emails to the author, Polly Hamilton, have still to this day gone unanswered. I suspect she resided in the US, where however, I am not sure - I hope as I work my way through the entire tree I will discover where she fits in.

But I digress.

The other tree I discovered documented on Ancestry. What an exciting day that was! The owner of that tree, a Fraser, resides with his tree in England. We correspond frequently and are now collaborating to bring the Tree into the 21st century.

Then it happened - that 'cousin bait' everyone talks about - I got a bite!  I was contacted through this blog by a man in Scotland who has a tree that was his mother's. The exact same tree!

He sent a photo:

Yup. Same tree.

It appears to be in excellent condition. Perhaps one reason is that it did not travel across the ocean and live rolled up behind a furnace for who knows how many years ....

Here are the other two - mine on the left, clearly more distressed, the England tree on the right.



This new 'cousin' has his origins just off the trunk on the lower right branch. He springs from the original Duncan/Isobel children. I fork off about half way up - also on the right - a sprout of a child of Duncan and Isobel. Our other 'cousin' is all the way at the top of the tree - the offspring of a second generation descendant of Duncan and Isobel. Quite the variety! 

And there are lots and lots of branches on that tree. The mind boggles imagining just how many trees could potentially be out there. 

In basements.

In attics.

In landfills (oh my, I hope not!)

In curiosity shops.

On eBay?

I'll keep plugging along, documenting the work John Fraser did in 1880 - I have what John did not, I have the help of the amazing newfangled invention, the internet! He, on the other hand, had the advantage of being 137 years closer to the origins of the family. 

One thing that bemuses us all .... what's up with the blue/green coloring on selected branches? One theory, those are the families that received a Tree. That remains to be seen, but it's a curious mystery for sure.

The work continues.

Lets hope we can catch a few more 'cousins' with this bait ......



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of the Town of Northfield, MA




A History of the Town of Northfield, Massachusetts: For 150 Years, with an Account of the Prior Occupation of the Territory by the Squakheags : and with Family Genealogies


Josiah Howard Temple, George Sheldon
J. Munsell, 1875 - Epitaphs - 636 pages



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved



Friday, February 24, 2017

Photo Friday :: Mrs Parsons


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!


Do you know me?
Mrs Parsons
"friend of Mr & Mrs E. W. Twining"
1880's

Mr and Mrs E. W. Twining lived in Corning, IA
~the back of the photo is marked Williams & Thomson, Kansas City~

©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, February 23, 2017

Video Of TheWeek: Starting Out with the 1939 Register

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Agnes Bane Fraser and James Porteous Scott

the 1880 John Fraser Family Tree
35. Agnes Bane Fraser (Duncan - 10, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born September 14th 1838



married November 7th 1867



James Porteous Scott birth unrecorded



children of this union:

i. George Scott b. August 10th 1868

ii. Alyson Grieve Forsyth Scott b. January 31st 1870

iii. Duncan Fraser Scott b. December 15th 1871

iv. Walter Scott b. April 29th 1877




note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.



~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Sarah Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Sarah Faulkner (William, James, William) was born about 1789 in Ulster Co, New York to William Bull Faulkner and his second wife Agnes "Nancy" McWilliams. Sarah was the firstborn of this second marriage.

Sarah married William T Bush Jr about 1821 in New York.


Children born to this union include: (all born in Tompkins Co, New York)


  • Esther Bush b. 1 Nov 1821 d. 1856
  • Nancy J Bush b. 11 Aug 1823 d. 1880 (may have married Jacob Dudley)
  • Nelson Bush Sr b. 20 Aug 1826 d. 20 Nov 1909 m. 1st Margaret DeReamer 2nd Harriet Crawford
  • Joseph Faulkner Bush b. 9 Jun 1829 d. 2 Dec 1832

Sarah Faulkner Bush died July 22nd 1853 and is buried in the Newfield Village Cemetery in Tompkins Co, New York with her husband and both sons.



Anyone with additional information on this family is encouraged to contact me - I'd love to collaborate with anyone related to or researching them.

©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 20, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Six




Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!


the Twining papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.


Twining Story, cont.

Elijah Twining, son of William IV, was born in 1741 in Eastham, Mass. He married Louis Rogers, daughter of Judah Rogers in 1763.

"In the spring of 1783 Elijah came to Granville, Mass., rolled up a log hut and began to clear the land. In the fall he returned for his family. He went down and back three times on foot. On one of these 'tramps' it is said he took 6,000 in specie and on the way called on a tavern where he thrust his moneybag in a corner. A darkey in sweeping the floor had occasion to move the money but to his credit it is said he only looked up and smiled. Such confidence and recklessness. Dinner cost 12 1/2.

Wolves and bears were plenty and could be heard paddling in the brook just at the foot of the hill on which the log house stood. They drove the stacks of grain full of 'spikes' to keep the wolves out. At the Cape the hay was poled upon the uplands and there left to have the rains wash the salt out of it. Cattle was small of stature because of the salt in excess. Usually four pair of cattle were attached to the plow and they would go around the piece of land seven times so large was the piece to be plowed.

 Besides property in Eastham, Elijah owned 2000 acres in Granville. Elijah was one time constable of Eastham and the Collector. A very accurate and systematic businessman, judgement was good and word was law.

He was a member of the Congregational church (Orleans) before 1773. It was said that he gave more than any other to his church. He deeded his property to his children in 1800, there were ten."


GENEALOGY

Elijah Twining b. 11/4/1741
                       d. 10/2/1802
                       m. 9/17/1763 to Louis Rogers
                                              daughter of Judah Rogers and Lois Young
                                                   b. 4/1744
                                                   d. 4/30/1815

Children:

William Sr b. 11/13/1763 d. 11/12/1846
Eleazer b. 5/29/1765 d. 5/30/1829 m. 1/29/1795 to Mercy Smith
Ruth b. 12/2/1766 d. 11/13/1828
Joseph b. 9/28/1768 d. 1773
Judah b. 1774 d. 8/27/1854 m. to Catherine Fowler
Abigail b. 1775 d. 1775
Lewis Sr b. 4/11/1777 d. 7/18/1821 m. 4/25/1800 to Jeannette Smith
Timothy b. 2/16/1782 d. 9/22/1824 m. 10/26/1809 to Betsey Hall
Susanna b. 4/28/1787 d. 3/18/1812 m. 12/13/1808 to Edward Wolcott
Lois b. 10/8/1790 d. 2/14/1810



[note: Elijah Twining is now a recognized DAR Patriot #A119525]



.............to be continued...............




***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. *** 



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, February 19, 2017

The Czachorowskys | From Prussia to Chicago: Bernard Czachorowsky


The Czachorowskys are a conundrum. They seem to simply 'appear' in Chicago around 1868. Claiming to be from Prussia I have yet to determine their actual origins. Or their point of entry into the United States. Or why they chose Chicago. As I set out to research one family I discovered others. Curiosity getting the best of me, this turned into the study of five Czachorowsky families living in Chicago c. 1870.  It is my hope with this series to make some discoveries to either link these families together, or prove they are not related. This is a real-time research project, I have not worked on this cluster before. I plan to share my discoveries and my frustrations in hopes that more eyes on the evidence will result in some sound conclusions. Join me as I explore these families, maybe we'll make some discoveries together!



BERNARD CZACHOROWSKY 1832 ~ 1915
his life and times

I first found what appears to be Bernard on a ships manifest, leaving Naumburg, Prussia bound for America, November 14, 1856.



He arrived in New York December 31, 1856.



He proceeded to 'go missing' until 1870 when he reappeared in Chicago living in the 8th Ward with a woman named Mena; who was 12 years his junior. He claimed to be from Poland. Still haven't figured out who Mena was, she seems to never be heard from again - could be a wife, could be a sister?


He is also listed in the City Directory for the first time in 1870, which means he would have been in Chicago at least as early as 1869 to have supplied information to be published for the annual directory. 


Bernard seemed to come and go throughout the years. Always a carpenter by trade.

He was involved in a pretty big lawsuit with the Chicago Driving Park corporation in 1885. The park refused to pay so he took it to the Superior Court in 1891. As we learned in this post, Bernard lived for a time almost across the street from the Driving Park. He may have been more involved with the corporation, or he may have fallen for the allure of gambling........


Between 1892 and 1897 Bernard 'went missing' again. One can speculate that he finally won his lawsuit. He reappeared in 1898, still at the same address he'd lived at more or less consistently since he first arrived in Chicago in 1870. I suspect this was a rooming house, searching the City Directories by address reveal more than one unrelated person living at the address, along with Bernard, throughout the years.

In 1900 he is found living with his [presumed] brother Anton. He is listed as a widow. And we learned that he was born in August of 1832. In Germany? This will remain a mystery - the Prussian borders were changing frequently, Berlin was the capitol, which became part of the new German Empire in 1871. By 1918 Prussia ceased to exist.

That is the last time Bernard appeared anywhere on record.

His death came in 1915. December 16th. He was 83. His death certificate tells a sad end to a long, perhaps difficult life.

He died in the Oak Forest Infirmary, a poorhouse, of lobar pneumonia. His previous address was listed as 3129 S Halstead, Chicago. His burial took place January 5th 1916. Perhaps the delay was a search for family to claim the body?

He was laid to rest at St Gabriel Cemetery - in an unmarked grave - taking all of his secrets with him.

An article printed in the Chicago Tribune in 1991 tells the tale of St Gabriel:

Patch Of Land Near Cicero Ave. Has More To It Than Meets Eye
May 31, 1991|By Ronald Koziol.

 "The weathered bronze statue in the middle of the lot seems distinctly out of place off busy Cicero Avenue near Interstate Highway 57. Patches of purple and white wildflowers dot both sides of a gravel road leading to the nondescript land.
 Few passing motorists are aware that the 15-acre tract at 164th Street in Oak Forest is St. Gabriel`s Cemetery, first opened in 1913 by the Franciscan fathers.
 And fewer know that what appears to be an undeveloped plot is the burial ground for 7,312 Catholics, most of whom were destitute or declared mentally ill and abandoned by their families to die in county homes early in the century.
 Although thousands of flowers are placed on graves regularly at other cemeteries in the Chicago area, not one could be found at St. Gabriel`s a few days after Memorial Day. The last burial there took place more than 11 years ago.
 No markers identify graves, and only the statue of St. Francis of Assisi looks over the land directly south of Cook County`s Oak Forest Hospital. The passing years have covered the gravesites with a shifting landscape that obscures any signs that the property is a cemetery.
 ``It was a potter`s field for Catholics who died in the old Oak Forest infirmary,`` said an employee of Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Chicago, where many charity cases are now buried for the Chicago Archdiocese.
 St. Gabriel`s probably will never again be used for burials, said Dolores Vendl, spokeswoman for the Archdiocesan Catholic Cemeteries.
 But don`t look for condos or a new subdivision to spring up there. Because the land is consecrated by the church, it will always remain a burial place, said a diocesan official.
 To expedite burials years ago, concrete vaults were set in rows in the ground and covered with dirt until needed. Several empty crypts remain in the ground.
 Despite the graves` lack of markers or gravestones, cemetery officials said they can pinpoint the plots of the people buried there since it was opened. But in the past 13 years, only one family has sought the remains of a long-lost relative for removal to another location.
 Contributions from relatives averaged about $9 a month during the early 1950s, but they stopped almost 30 years ago as families died off.
 For 40 years, from its opening until 1953, St. Gabriel`s was run by priests from nearby St. Roch`s friary, who conducted simple funeral rites for the dead.
 The archdiocese, which operates 41 cemeteries in the Chicago area, took over St. Gabriel`s from the Franciscans in 1953 when the order could no longer maintain it."

Rest In Peace Bernard


......until next time!



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Book Of The Week: Chicago Blue Book 1885



The Chicago Blue Book of Selected Names of Chicago and Suburban Towns ...

Chicago Directory Company, 1885





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, February 17, 2017

Photo Friday :: Dr Parsons


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!


Do you know me?
Dr Parsons
'friend of E. W. Twining"
1880's

E.W. Twining lived in Corning IA
~the back of the photo is marked Williams & Thomson, Kansas City~


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Video Of The Week: AncestryDNA: What To Do With All Those Matches

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | James Galloway and Catherine McKenzie

1880 John Fraser Family Tree
34. James Galloway (Helen - 9, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born November 25th 1827


married at Calcutta


Catherine McKenzie birth unrecorded



children of this union (all born Calcutta):


i. Donald Galloway born 1864

ii. Minnie Galloway born 1866

iii. Wilton Galloway born 1868

iv. Alice Galloway born 1870

v. Herbert Galloway born 1873

vi. Ethel Galloway born 1875



note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Matthew Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Matthew Faulkner (William, James, William) was born between 1773 and 1778 in Middletown New York to William Bull Faulkner and his first wife, name UNK.

Matthew married Isabelle(a) Robinson sometime before 1816.


Children born to this union include:

  • James Faulkner b. abt 1816 d. 27 Nov 1896 m. 1st Harriet Greer 2nd Rebecca Jane Tucker
  • Eleanor Faulkner b. abt 1818 d. UNK "went South" *
  • William Faulkner b. abt 1820 d. UNK "went South" *
  • Asai or Levi Faulkner b. abt 1821 d. UNK "went South" *
  • John Faulkner b. abt 1823 d. UNK "went South" *

Matthew Faulkner, it is recorded, died November 19th 1857. His wife Isabelle is recorded as died November 19th 1856. They are both said to be buried in Middletown New York. 

*According to family lore a family feud broke out because one of Matthew's sons (James?) married a Catholic so all but James went south.

According to family tradition, Matthew hired some Indians to do a piece work, agreeing to pay them with all the whisky they could carry in a basket. The Indians soaked and treated the basket making it watertight.



Anyone with additional information on this family is encouraged to contact me - I'd love to collaborate with anyone related to or researching them.



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, February 13, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Five


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!

the Twining papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.   

Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.



Twining Story, cont.

William IV, son of William III, like his father before him, very little is know of his life. He lived in Old Eastham, Massachusetts, but was said to have practiced law in Ohio for a time. (Never proved) William married Apphia Lewis in 1728. The couple had six children.




GENEALOGY

William Twining IV b. 9/2/1704
                              d. 11/17/1769
                              m. 2/21/1728 to Apphia Lewis
                                             daughter of Thomas Lewis and his wife Jane
                                                         b. 5/9/1704
                                                         d. 9/?/1793


children:

Abigail b. 12/28/1730 d. 3/9/1769 m. 2/1750 to Joseph Rogers Jr
Thomas b. 7/5/1733 d. 4/23/1816 m. 10/24/1765 to Anna Cole
Ruth b. 12/30/1736 d. 3/9/1769
William b. 3/16/1739 d. 1759
Elijah b. 11/4/1741 d. 10/2/1802 m. 9/17/1763 to Louis Rogers
Eleazer b. 3/18/1744 d. 8/13/1762




***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. *** 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Book Of The Week: The Argonauts of California


The Argonauts of California: Being the Reminiscences of Scenes and Incidents that Occurred in California in Early Mining Days


University Microfilms, 1890 - California - 501 pages





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, February 10, 2017

Tools For The Dig: State Focused Research | Illinois



State Focused Research | Illinois

I'm starting this series with Illinois because it's my home state. I thought about starting with Delaware, the first official state, and moving down the list. Or maybe alphabetical. But finally decided upon this rather random selection. I think it will progress just as randomly, sometimes it's good to be surprised!

Some of my favorite research sites are slightly off-radar by today's definition. 

First I'd like to talk about Genealogy Trails. From their homepage: "Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers. We are all about adding data for you to use in researching your family lines!!!We know that what you're looking for is data -- and we have LOTS of it right here. 
Our hosts work continuously to bring you fresh, interesting and NEW data (well.... as new as hundred year old data can be!!!)" Pretty much everything you need to know to begin your Illinois research is contained within the pages of  Illinois Genealogy Trails. This is a thorough, well thought out site - and they are always looking for volunteers!

Companion Yahoo! Group: Genealogy Trails/Illinois

Next up, RAOGK. Another volunteer site. A treasure trove of links, well organized and easy to understand. From this site you can request look-up from a team of Illinois volunteers. Or add you name to the volunteer list id Illinois is your home-base.

ILGenWeb is an oldie but a goody! Volunteer based also, this database was founded in 1996! From their home page: "ILGenWeb isn’t an ordinary genealogy website. Ordinary websites are those where text and sometimes pretty pictures are present, but trying to get in touch with a real person to help you with your research… impossible. The strength of ILGenWeb is its many volunteers, some of whom have spent over a decade assisting others with their Illinois research. Using our county page visit the Illinois county your ancestors lived in and first try and find any information the county may freely provide on their pages (most have some sort of search built in). If the particular fact isn’t available online, then reach out to the county coordinator (cc) and they will try and assist you as best they can. Most county coordinators have their email address available on their website, though some will use contact forms."

FamilySearch:
Illinois State Wiki
Illinois State Catalog


State societies and archives include:
Illinois State Genealogical Society
Illinois State Historical Society
Illinois State Archives


A comprehensive list of newspapers can be found at The Ancestor Hunt's Illinois page.


For social context look at Illinois Digital Archives,  DPLA Illinois Hub and the Newberry library


For Cook County/City of Chicago check these out:
Linkpendium: Cook County Genealogy
Forgotten Chicago
A Look At Cook
Chicago Ancestors
Encyclopedia of Chicago


As I discover more resources I'll update this post. Do you have any Illinois favorites that I've missed? Please share!


©2017 Anne Faulkner - Ancestor Archaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, February 9, 2017

Video Of The Week: Using New England Probate Records


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Elizabeth Galloway and Robert Brown

33. Elizabeth Galloway (Helen - 9, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born December 4th 1818


married January 3rd 1843


Robert Brown born March 5th 1813



children of this union:

    i. Agnes Galloway Brown b. February 4th 1845

    ii. John Brown b. June 27th 1846 d. September 22nd 1849

    iii. Margaret Brown b. May 4th 1848

    iv. George Brown b. March 31st 1852

65 v. Helen Brown b. April 3rd 1855 m. Andrew Robertson


Neither Elizabeth's or Robert's deaths are recorded.





~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Achsah Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Achsah Faulkner (William, James, William) was born about 1777 in Middletown, then Ulster County, New York, the firstborn child to William Bull Faulkner and his first wife, name UNK.

Achsah married James Boak in 1799 in Orange County New York.

Children born to this union include:

  • John Boak b. 22 Nov 1799 d. 31 Oct 1836 m. Mary Clark
  • Lettie Boak b. abt 1800 d. 14 Dec 1825
  • Mary Boak b. 17 Oct 1801 d. 6 Mar 1870 m. John Everett Bruster
  • Robert Boak b. 9 Dec 1806 d. 20 May 1881 m. Mary Youngblood
  • Martha Boak b. 14 Aug 1810 d. 1877 m. John Youngblood
  • Melinda Boak b. 14 Aug 1810 d. 1894
  • Lucinda Boak b. 21 Apr 1814 d. Aug 1895
  • James Faulkner Boak b. 8 Mar 1817 d. 5 Apr 1889 b. Martha Coleman Vail
  • Arminda "Emily" Boak b. 16 May 1823 d. 28 Nov 1894

Achsah Faulkner Boak died February 13th 1858. She is buried in the Scotchtown Cemetery in Scotchtown New York with her husband and six of her children.



Anyone with additional information on this family is encouraged to contact me - I'd love to collaborate with anyone related to or researching them.

©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, February 6, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Twining Lineage and Genealogy, Part Four


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light!


the Twining papers
The Twinings held a special fascination for my Grandmother. Her middle name was Twining. Her mother was a Twining. She drank Twining's tea, as did the rest of our family. I'm unclear as to the link between our family and the Twining's Tea Company, however. Our Twining ancestor came to the 'New World' c.1640 and has been recorded in the small book Genealogy of the Twining family : descendants of William Twining, Sr, who came from Wales or England.


Of all the research I inherited, the Twining collection is by far the most expansive. My grandmother wrote 'stories' and typed up other little sketches on them. I will present them to you here, as written by her.




Twining Story, cont.

Continuing down the lineage, another William; William III. Very little is known of this steadfast Puritan. His reason for remaining on the Cape when his parents, brother Stephen, and probably his two sisters, had gone to Pennsylvania may evidently be found in his unwillingness to compromise the ancestral religion. He may have been content with that 'barren waste' which had produced so many noble men and women who blessed the world for having lived. Whatever his motives, it remains to his credit that he was a man who transmitted to his descendants those qualities which have made their name an honor wherever they have gone. Many have filled professions of distinction. The cause of Christianity has been greatly blessed by their devotions.


GENEALOGY

William Twining III b. 2/28/1654
                                 d. 1/23/1734
                                  m. 3.26.1688/9 to Ruth Cole
                                                     daughter of John Cole and Ruth Snow
                                                             b. 3/11/1667
                                                             d. 3/4/1728


children:

Eliza b. 8/25/1690 d. UNK
Thankful b. 1/11/1697 d. UNK
Ruth b. 8/27/1699 d. UNK
Hannah b. 4.2.1702 d. UNK m. 6/12/1731 to David Young
William IV b. 2/9/1704 d. 11/17/1769 m. 2/21/1727 to Apphia Lewis
Barnabas b. 9/29/1705 d. 3/5/1766 m. to Hannah Sweet
Mercy b. 2/20/1708 d. UNK





.................to be continued.......................




***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. *** 




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection


Sunday, February 5, 2017

RootsTech 2017 ... From Home!

Image result for rootstech 2017 logo
It's that time again. Time for the Big Show. No, not Christmas. (But in a way Christmas for genealogists!) It's RootsTech time! And again this year I will be unable to attend. (insert frowny face here) Never fear! The folks at RootsTech have made some of their sessions available for live-streaming AND there's an app where you can download syllabus material to your computer or your phone.

No swag, no rubbing of elbows, no "genealogy contact high" from being in a room with so many like-minded people ..... but RootsTech from Home is still pretty fun - and you don't have to change out of your jammies. (or whatever you wear in your Cave - I'm not here to judge)

I'll be "attending" - maybe I'll "see" you there too! 

From the homepage: "Not able to attend in person? Several sessions at RootsTech 2017, including the general keynote sessions, will be streamed live on the home page of RootsTech.org. After the conference, recordings of these sessions will be posted on the website for a limited time."

CLICK HERE for the home page. (note: the link won't be active until RootsTech actually starts)

Speaker line-up: (times given in MST)

Wednesday

9:00 a.m.–10:00 a.m. | Innovator Summit General Session
Speakers: Steve Rockwood, Liz Wiseman

10:15 a.m.–11:15 a.m. | Industry Trends and Outlook
Speakers: Craig Bott and Guest Panel

11:30 a.m.–12:00 p.m. | Innovation—Best Practices and Applications
Speaker: Cydni Tetro

Thursday

8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m. | RootsTech General Session
Speakers: Steve Rockwood, Jonathan and Drew Scott

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. | Getting Started in Genealogy
Speaker: Kelli Bergheimer

12:15 p.m.–1:15 p.m. | DNA: The Glue That Holds Families Together
Speaker: Diahan Southard

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. | DNA Matching on MyHeritage
Speaker: Dana Drutman

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. | Jewish Genealogy: Where to Look and What’s Available
Speaker: Lara Diamond

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. | Family History Is Anything but Boring
Speakers: Crystal Farish and Rhonna Farrer

Friday

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m. | RootsTech General Session
Speakers: Levar Burton, Special Guest Panel

10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. | RootsTech Innovator Showdown Finals

12:15 p.m.–1:15 p.m. | Mothers, Daughters, Wives: tracing Female Lines
Speaker: Judy Russell

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. | Censational Census Strategies
Speaker: Mary Kircher Roddy

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. | Big 4: Comparing Ancestry, findmypast, FamilySearch, and MyHeritage
Speaker: Sunny Morton

4:30 p.m.–5:30 p.m. | Cross the Atlantic with Religious Records
Speaker: Jen Baldwin

Saturday

8:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m. | RootsTech General Session
Speakers: Cece Moore, Buddy Valastro

11:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. | Journaling Principles That Work
Speaker: Steve Reed

1:30 p.m.–2:30 p.m. | Don’t Just Be a Searcher, Be a Researcher
Speaker: Crista Cowan

3:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m. | Creating Google Alerts for Your Genealogy
Speaker: Katherine R. Wilson


And you can download syllabus material with this desktop app!

(yes, I have already saved one - glad I took the screenshot before I saved everything!)

Both Genea-Musings and the Ancestry Insider have done very nice blog posts describing how to use this app - please visit their posts to learn more:

Genea-Musings 




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Saturday, February 4, 2017

Book Of The Week: Chicago America's Railroad Capital



Chicago: America's Railroad Capital: The Illustrated History, 1836 to Today


Brian Solomon, John Gruber, Michael Blaszak, Chris Guss
Voyageur Press, Oct 14, 2014 - History - 192 pages

The first illustrated history of the people, machines, facilities, and operations that made Chicago the hub around which an entire continent's rail industry still revolves. In the mid-nineteenth century, Chicago's central location in the expanding nation helped establish it as the capital of the still-new North American railroad industry. As the United States expanded westward, new railroads and rail-related companies like Pullman established their headquarters in the Windy City, while eastern railroads found their natural western terminals there. Historically, railroads that tried to avoid Chicago failed. While the railroad industry has undergone dramatic changes over the course of its existence, little has changed regarding Chicago's status as the nation's railroad hub. In Chicago: America's Railroad Capital, longtime, prolific railroading author and photographer Brian Solomon - joined by a cast of respected rail journalists - examines this sprawling legacy of nearly 180 years, not only showing how the railroad has spurred the city's growth, but also highlighting the city's railroad workers throughout history, key players in the city and the industry, and Chicago's great interurban lines, fabulous passenger terminals, vast freight-processing facilities, and complex modern operations. Illustrated with historical and modern photography and specially commissioned maps, Chicago: America's Railroad Capital also helps readers understand how Chicago has operated - and continues to operate - as the center of a nationwide industry that is an essential cog in the country's commerce.





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, February 3, 2017

Sunday Sopabox: Special Edition ~ Immigrant Ancestors


I usually reserve the Sunday Soapbox for getting something off my chest. On Sunday. But I am feeling compelled, strongly, by all the recent global events to take a minute and give a shout out to all my immigrant ancestors. The ancestors who risked everything, everything, to make a new life for themselves. In a strange new world. Thousands upon thousands of miles away from all that was familiar. Not really knowing what fate awaited them, but believing that staying where they were was certain death, if not certain destitute poverty. We all want a bright, hopeful future. We all want a better life for our family and our children. This has not changed in the 2 million years since our first ancestors walked out of Africa. Countless wars have been waged over this very same issue. Territory. My territory, your territory. Heck, it's waged in sandboxes and kindergarten playgrounds every day, all around the globe.

But I digress.

I am here now, in this place, because of this roll call of dreamers and doers who had the gumption to get up out of their mediocrity - leave their ancestral homelands - go boldly toward the hope of a brighter tomorrow. To believe in themselves, and in humankind, enough to create something better than what had been. And in doing so joined millions of other immigrants, speaking a variety of languages, celebrating different customs, yet all cohabiting in this the New World.  Working toward the same goal.

Most of my immigrants were not 'legal' by today's standards. They just got on a boat and came. (Although I think a few may have come by TARDIS ....) But they all contributed to the tapestry that is America today. There are names of Pilgrims, Patriots, Pioneers and a lot of just plain folk working hard and getting by. Professors and politicians, housewives, farmers, lots of farmers, doctors, inventors, preachers, the list goes on.  I am proud of them all.

Immigrant Roll Call:

Arrival 1601 to 1700
1609 - Stephen Hopkins - England
1613 - Joseph Cobb - England
1620 - Isaac Allerton - England
1620 - Mary Norris - England
1621 - Stephen Deane - England
1621 - Elizabeth Ring - England
1623 - Nicholas Snow - England
1628 - Thomas Gerrard - England
1628 - Susannah Snow - England
1630 - John Doane - England
1630 - Mosses Mavericke - England
1630 - John Moseley - England
1630 - William Phelps - England
1631 - Richard Lyman - England
1631 - Sarah Osborne - England
1632 - Moses Rowley Sr - England
1632 - Henry Howland - England
1632 - Thomas Woodford - England
1632 - Mary Blott - England
1632 - Nathaniel Merriman - England
1633 - Matthew Allyn - England
1634 - Rowland Stebbins - Engalnd
1634 - Sarah Whiting - England
1634 - Thomas Newberry - England
1634 - John Stiles - England
1635 - John Thomas - England
1635 - Sarah Pitney - England
1636 - John Plumb - England
1636 - Dorothy Wood - England
1638 - Henry Burt - England
1638 - Ulalia Marche - England
1638 - John Hutchins - England
1638 - Walter Chiles - England
1638 - Polly Strangeman - England
1640 - Matthew Fuller - England
abt 1640 - Daniel Cole - England
abt 1640 - William Twining Sr - England
abt 1640 - John Curtiss - England
abt 1640 Elizabeth Welles - England
1643 - Robert Ellyson - Scotland
1650 - Robert Harris - Wales
1652 - Isaac Sheldon - England
1655 - Richmont Terrell - England
1655 - Elizabeth Wather - England
1656 - Mary Norton - England
1669 - William Overton - England
1669 - Mary Elizabeth Waters - England
1669 - John Hampton - Scotland
1679 - Christopher Gist - England
1679 - Edith Cromwell - England
1682 - Ezra Croasdale - England
1684 - Ann Peacock - England
1683 - Thomas Canby - England
1685 - Thomas Curtis - England
1685 - Jane Ogborne - England
1695 - John Potwine - England
abt 1699 Zachariah How - England
abt 1699 - Sarah Gilbert - England
1700 - Jerome Dumas - France
1700 - AbsolomVaughn - ?

Arrival 1701 to 1800
abt 1710 - Jonathan Hays - England
1726 - William Faulkner - Scotland
1726 - Mary Faulkner - Scotland
1728 - James McBride - Ireland
1729 - John Busby - England
1729 - Elizabeth Lisle - England
1732 - Thomas Wilson Sr - Scotland
1732 - Mary Riley - Ireland

Arrival 1801 to 1900
1819 - Michael Sammon - Ireland
1819 - Catherine Dunne - Ireland
1830 - Francis O'Rourke - Ireland
1830 - Ann Mclingin - Ireland
1832 - Alexander Fraser - Scotland
1832 - Elizabeth Chalmers - Scotland
1840 - James O'Connell - Ireland
1840 - Mary Dempsey - Ireland
1870 - Frederick Colyer - England

Born in America - parents unknown (probably came by TARDIS)
abt 1600 Thomas Crew
1631 Samuel Rockwell
1632 Elizabeth Wallace
1634 Mary Holton
1636 Abigail Bartlett
1640 Susannah Brooks
1642 Nathanial Grafton
1642 John Rogers
1649 Mary Claiborne
1655 Elizabeth Mayo
1658 Matthew Peatross
1660 Mordecai Price
1660 Henry Watkins
1662 Mary Parsons
1668 Mary Tilden
1669 Sarah Jarvis
1670 Ruth Bancroft
1670 Sarah Gatley
1670 Sarah Hill
1673 Anne Myhill
1673 Thomas Jackson
1680 Abigail Root
1681 Unity Smith
1684 Patience Lumbert
1684 Anne Skinner
1690 Elizabeth Elliot
1696 Mary Osborne
1704 Apphia Lewis
1717 Keturrah Merryman
1723 Melchezedec Brame
1726 Thomas Loveland
1728 Samuel Mannon
1734 Hannah Norcott
1740 Jerusha Kingsley
1744 William Wilton Ashby
1745 Sarah Williams
1772 Naomi Clarke
1775 Nathan Bass
1760 Samuel Beach
1786 Jesse Thomas
1790 Hackaliah Vredenburgh
1791 Sally Blackman
1803 Margaret Roberts
1829 Pamela Thompson
1833 Jennie Whitford



This land is your land, this land is my land
From the California to the New York Island
From the Redwood Forest, to the Gulf stream waters
This land was made for you and me
As I went walking that ribbon of highway
I saw above me that endless skyway
Saw below me the golden valley
This land was made for you and me
I roamed and rambled and followed my footsteps
To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
All around me a voice was sounding
This land was made for you and me
When the sun come shining, then I was strolling
In wheat fields waving and dust clouds rolling
The voice was chanting as the fog was lifting
This land was made for you and me
This land is your land, this land is my land
From the California to the New York Island
From the Redwood Forest, to the Gulf stream waters
This land was made for you and me
When the sun come shining, then I was strolling
In wheat fields waving and dust clouds rolling
The voice was chanting as the fog was lifting
This land was made for you and me
~Woody Guthrie


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved