Saturday, May 27, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of Morrow County, Ohio



History of Morrow County, Ohio: A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People, and Its Principal Interests, Volume 1
Abraham J. Baughman, Robert Franklin Bartlett
Lewis publishing Company, 1911 - Morrow County (Ohio)





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Video Of The Week: Organizing and Preserving Your Family Papers


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Alexander Johnstone and Mary Marcer

1880 John Fraser Family Tree
48. Alexander Johnstone (Isabella - 17, Alexander - 5, Duncan - 1) born July 29th 1822



married April 5th 1842 at Liverpool



Mary Marcer born September 5th 1819



children of this union:


i. Robert Johnstone b. August 1844 m. Ellen ??dson

ii. Issabell Johnstone b. September 23rd 1846 m. J Chand

iii. Alexander Johnstone b. November 7th 1848 m. Ruth Johnsen

iv. Mary Johnstone b. December 22nd 1850 m. William Kane

v. William Johnstone b. February 13th 1853 d. in infancy

vi. Thomas Johnstone b. March 30th 1854

vii. Janet Johnstone b. May 11th 1857 d. in infancy

viii. Harriet Johnstone b. March 19th 1859

ix. Margaret Ann Johnstone b. December 10th 1861

x. Alexis Lavinia Johnstone b. January 10th 1866





note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Letty Crawford {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

Letty Crawford (Mary, Samuel, William) was born in Crawford, Orange Co, New York on  December 14th 1803 to parents Mary Faulkner and William Crawford.

Letty married James I Crawford (relation unknown) about 1825 in Orange Co, New York.

The couple had at least eight children:

  • Helen Crawford b. 20 Jan 1826 d. 27 Sep 1892 never married
  • Adaline Crawford b. 15 Dec 1829 d. 12 Feb 1836
  • Esther Crawford b. about 1834 d. UNK
  • Ann Crawford b. about 1835 d. UNK
  • Francis Crawford b. 7 Mar 1838 d. 24 May 1887 m. Catherine E Bookstaver no issue
  • Caroline Crawford b. 18 Mar 1840 d. 7 May 1853
  • Adaline Crawford b. 13 Mar 1845 d. 22 Feb 1899 m. Benjamin G Benedict
  • James Crawford b. 16 Oct 1847 d. 14 Sep 1869


Letty Crawford died January 14th 1880 in Orange Co, New York. Her husband James Crawford died November 27th 1864 in Orange Co, New York. The couple is buried in the Crawford Cemetery along with four of their children. 



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, May 22, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Rowley Lineage and Genealogy, Part 5


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


Rowley Family Story con't ....
More on Rev. R C Rowley ~ anniversaries, birthdays, news 


GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY

Rev R C Rowley and Rhoda A Vredenburg were married in Greencastle Indiana on the 29th day of September, 1840 by Bishop Amos, and their 50th wedding anniversary was celebrated in a quiet way at their home in Brooks, Iowa, on Monday, the 29th by a few of their relatives. Those present were C J Vredenburg of Atlantic, brother of mother Rowley; Mrs John Goodall, of Birmingham, Iowa, sister of father Rowley; M M Rowley, wife and family of New Windsor, Ill; Mr and Mrs J L Twining, of Corning, and Mrs Anna Wilcox and son. The absent ones substantially represented were: a brother, Rev L T Rowley, of Danville, Iowa; Frank Rowley, of New Virginia, Iowa, and Ross and Harry Rowley, of Omaha, grandsons; and Mrs Jesse and Mac Strope, of Des Moines, granddaughter.

~1890 newspaper clipping

~~~~~0~0~0~0~0~~~~~

Rev R C Rowley of Brooks, Ia is the oldest Iowa man in attendance upon the general assembly, being now in his eighty-eighth year. Dr Rowley is not a commissioner, but attends all the sessions and is deeply interested in them. He came from Brooks unaccompanied, and despite his age, gets around with remarkable agility, being hale and hearty and as clear brained as though he was a half century younger. He was born in 1818, ordained in the Methodist church when but twenty years of age and became a Presbyterian in 1862. He organized the Brooks Presbyterian church in 1877, and was pastor of it until four or five years ago.

~1906 newspaper clipping

~~~~~0~0~0~0~0~~~~~


A BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION!

There was much rejoicing in the home of Mr and Mrs J L Twining from the fact that Father Rowley and Mother Twining have passed another milestone in their lives. Birthdays, and the same day! Mrs E W Twining was 94 and Rev Rowley was 93 - July 18, 1911. The lady is the mother of Jesse Twining and the gentleman, the father of his wife. The two 'brithday folk' have been members of the Twining household for years and are greatly loved and honored. Beloved by all, family and friends, they are as happy an elderly couple as Corning affords. They have had remarkable health and Dr Rowley makes his daily journey 'uptown' always with a smile and a handshake for everybody. Mrs Twining is active within the household. Their minds are clear; Father has an unusual memory, it is wonderful to hear him recall the past and present events with ease and accuracy. He always has a fund of information on any subject. All Corning and the surrounding countryside are joyfully interested in the anniversaries of these old beloved and honored citizens.

~Corning IA, 18 July 1911 newspaper clipping


~~~~~0~0~0~0~0~~~~~


In response to expression of regard on his ninety-third birthday

"I assure you that such voluntary expressions of esteem are more precious than silver and gold. It makes one feel that he has not lived and labored in vain. It revives in memory the pleasant associations and fellowship of the past. About seventy-five years have been spent in the ministry. They have been years of toil and exposure in the wilderness of Indiana and on the bleak prairies of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. But they have been years of pleasure and great enjoyment. The Lord, whom I have tried to serve, has been with me, and although I have made many mistakes, thru life and His grace I am what I am.

And now, as I approach the evening of life, the future looks as bright as the promises of Our Heavenly Father. I should like to take each of you by the hand and tell you how much I prize these tokens of friendship. May the God of All Grace be with each one of you and keep you by His power unto everlasting life."

~~~~~0~0~0~0~0~~~~~


..........to be continued ..........


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1950-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Brick Wall Ancestor | #5 Stephen Colfer


We all have them! Those stubborn ancestors that refuse to come out of hiding. No matter how much coaxing we do! Well, I think it's time to bring them out of the shadows - put their redacted story out there - another piece of the puzzle could be lurking just around the (cyber) corner, in someone's basement, or closet, or sitting in a box on a bookshelf ...... You never, ever know where that loose chink will manifest, the one that allows you to push out one brick, then the next. Food for thought. So without further ado....


Brick Wall Ancestor | #5 Stephen Colfer

Maybe not so much a Brick Wall as a Missing Person, this one will be short and sweet. Stephen seemed to appear briefly as a grown man and then disappear. His name doesn't help - at least it's not John Smith - but an Irishman named Stephen Colfer? A dime a dozen!

What I know:

Stephen Colfer was born about 1840 in Wexford County, Ireland. His parents were John Colfer* and Margaret Walsh. 

Stephen married Catherine (aka Mary, aka Jane) O'Brien on August 10th 1859 in Ontario County, Ontario, Canada. 

See below for expanded view

Groom - Residence - Birth Place - Father - Mother - Bride - Bride Residence

Birth Place - Father - Mother - Residence - Marriage Date
The couple had four children born in Canada, then about 1868 the family immigrated to Evanston, IL where their last two children were born.

Stephen shows up on only ONE census - 1870. Evanston City Directories did not begin until 1880 - so no help there!

In 1876 Stephen's wife left him and the children and moved to Chicago. They never divorced. Catherine (aka Mary, aka Jane) married again, a man named William Walking. When Catherine returned to Evanston in 1878 to try to get her children, Stephen discovered what had happened and filed charges against his estranged wife.

Story About Stephen Colfer and Wife

I have not discovered the outcome of the Criminal Court case yet. That might hold some clues.

Stephen was in Evanston as late as 1878 when he filed the warrants, but he is not on the 1880 census.

Most of the children were on the 1880 census, the girls working as domestic servants, the boys were boarders working labor jobs. So, not living with either their father or their mother. They were mostly all under the age of 15.  

Catherine (aka Mary, aka Jane) went on to have three more children with her 'husband' William Walking. I have not found a divorce record for her and Stephen.

Stephen Colfer, it seems, disappeared into the night, never to be seen again.

So many questions! Did he go back to Canada? Ireland? Get remarried and have a second family? Die? When did he even immigrate to Canada? As a child? Adult? With family? Alone?

There is a Stephen Colfer who is registered to vote in Chicago in 1890. The record states that this Stephen had only been in Illinois 10 years, 'our' Stephen would have been in Illinois 20 years by this time. Still, something to look into further, perhaps.  


Genealogy:

Stephen Colfer b. abt 1840 Wexford County, Ireland d. UNK
                 m. 10 Aug 1859 Catherine (aka Mary, aka Jane) O'Brien Ontario, Canada

children:
  • Genevieve "Jennie" Colfer b. 9 Nov 1862 Canada d. 21 Jul 1948 Chicago IL m. James Bixler
  • John Colfer b. abt 1863 Canada d. aft 1910
  • Ellen "Nellie" Colfer b. Jan 1865 Canada d. 15 Sep 1940 Chicago IL m. John McCabe
  • Thomas Colfer b. Jan 1868 Canada d. 24 Oct 1943 Chicago IL m. Mary Ann Nally
  • James Colfer b. 1869 Evanston IL d. 24 Mar 1934 Chicago IL
  • Mary Colfer b. abt 1872 Evanston IL d. aft 1930 m. William Raftree 


*John Colfer, Stephen's father, is found on several Irish records available on Ancestry and Findmypast. I believe I found him on Griffith's Valuation and in some Parish records for Wexford County. Irish research is new to me, I may learn more as I dig deeper. 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of White County, Illinois





History of White County, Illinois: Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages and Townships, Educational, Religious, Civil, Military and Political History
White County Historical Society, 1883 - Illinois - 972 pages




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 19, 2017

Photo Friday :: Another Mystery Baby


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!




Do you know me?
From the Mystery Collection
taken at Schiffer's Art Studio in Cleveland, OH
back image below






©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, May 18, 2017

Video Of The Week: How to Break Down Brick Walls Before 1837

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Alexander Fraser and Sarah Ann Crum

1880 John Fraser Family Tree
47. Alexander Fraser (Hugh - 16, John - 4, Duncan - 1) born November 28th 1850


married


Sarah Ann Crum birth not recorded



children of this union:


i. James Fraser b. February 13th 1874

ii. John Duncan Fraser b. December 25th 1875

iii. William Fraser b. January 12th 1880




note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | James H Crawford {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

James H Crawford (Mary, Samuel, William) was born June 23rd 1801 in Crawford, Orange Co, New York to parents Mary Faulkner and William Crawford.

James H married Catherine W Bull (born about 1803) about 1825 in Orange Co, New York.

The couple had at least five children:

  • Mary E Crawford b. 1826 d. before 1855 m. Cornelius Decker
  • Harriet Crawford b. 1830 d. 4 May 1875 m. William McKeag
  • James H Crawford Jr b. 20 Jun 1833 d. 13 May 1888 m. Catherine C Brush
  • Sarah Crawford b. abt 1838 d. 1854
  • John Erskine Crawford b. abt 1841 d. before 1900 m. Sarah Bull Thompson 

James H Crawford died between October 13th 1864, when he penned his will, and April 11th 1866 when the will was presented in court for proof. Most likely that first quarter of 1866. His wife Catherine died sometime after 1875. 

Burial location of both James and Catherine are unknown.




©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, May 15, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Rowley Lineage and Genealogy, Part 4


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


Rowley Family Story con't ....
More on Rev. R C Rowley ~ writings, meditations, observations 


FOR WORLD PEACE 
Rev. R. C. Rowley a minister for 70 years 
(newspaper article - unsourced - St Louis MO area)

To have lived 90 years and to have spent as many of them in ministerial service as are allotted to man Biblically for a lifetime is the record of Rev. R C Rowley, who is here on a visit to his daughter, Mrs Wilcox, 406 North Tenth St. Rev. Mr. Rowley preached the morning sermon at the Second Presbyterian Church Sunday, and interested his audience greatly.

His 90 years have given him snow white hair, but have not robbed him of interest and vigor. He can talk very entertainingly of his early days in the Indiana wilderness, preaching for the hardy emigrants who were pushing the limits of the New World civilization westward. He is a pronounced optimist, and finds the world a better and more pleasant place these latter days of his life than in the early days, better in every sense - physically, morally and spiritually. There is no desire on Rev. Rowley's part to go back to the 'good old days', and no uncertain note in his commendation of present days.

Sitting erectly in his arm chair as a military man, the Rev. Rowley, of whom one scarcely feels it appropriate to speak as aged, chatted genially, giving his reasons for thinking the world better.

"I've gone thru life with my eyes and ears open," he said smiling, "and I've seen these things. The world had improved almost beyond words in the matter of temperance. Every man, in my young days, kept whiskey, and no raising or harvesting could be had without it. Why, even the children were lined up on cold mornings to get their portions of whiskey. Then, too, profanity was more common. And neighbors have better feelings nowadays. We don't have so many neighborhood feuds and so many family quarrels that involve whole neighborhoods. But the greatest advance of all is in common humanity - the feeling people have for unfortunates, and the feeling among nations that is leading to such things, that is leading to peace conferences and their work. This will be the big work of the coming era." said Rev. Rowley, concluding a chat on current events on which he keeps thoroughly posted, and in which he takes a keen interest.

"World peace will shortly be an accomplished thing", and a hopeful smile lighted the face, browned so thoroughly in early years of exposure that it could never lose it's tan. "We are on the road toward ending wars."

 ~ 9/29/1808

~~~~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~~~~

Rev R C Rowley is one of the most interesting characters we have ever met. He is interesting largely from the fact that he has lived 92 years and has a mind as clear as many a man's who is only 50. He has always taken a great interest in current events. Think if it. Born the year Illinois, then a wild country and inhabited largely by Indians, was admitted in the Union. There were no railroads, anf the steamboat was in it's infancy. He saw the first steamboat the plied on Lake Erie. He attended the first temperance meeting ever held where people were asked to sign the pledge. In those days when the minister mad a ministerial call the demijohn was set out and the preacher had to take a drink to be social. Mr Rowley knew Lincoln and Douglas well and has been in court when they practiced. He was through the abolition days and knows all about the underground railroad. He says the many changes that have come in his time make him feel almost as if he was living in another world. If times were reversed and the railroad, the telegraph, the telephone, the binder, the mower, threshing machine and all modern machinery were taken away from the present generation and we were set back to the conditions under which Rev Rowley started life we would certainly conclude that this is another world.

~Aledo, Illinois Record


~~~~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~~~~

SEES COMET SECOND TIME

Corning has a resident who saw the famous Haley's comet on the occasion of that heavenly wanderers visit to the earth in 1835, and also has viewed it at the present time. (1909) That person is Rev R C Rowley. He is now nearly 92 years of age. He tells us that it does not appear to be as bright now as it was 75 years ago. Mr Rowley also told us of a famous German astronomer who became so excited while making his observations of the comet that he fainted, and the work had to be completed by an assistant. Mr Rowley said that the astronomer had figured that the comet and the earth would have a collision and that calculation came very near being correct, as the two bodies passed the point in space within two minutes of each other.

~~~~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~0~~~~

Religious Meditation by Rev R C Rowley
(New Year's Eve?)

1st) There are times when we should drop the activities of life for a season, and think seriously, meditate carefully, especially in the evening twilight of the dying year. Tonight we stand upon the point that divides ninety-three from ninety-four, a favorable time to pause and review the past; to meditate upon the scenes through which we have been brought during the year now closing, the trials, disappointments, sorrows, opportunities, joys and mercies. They are all gone, gone forever never to return.
2nd) Meditate upon the responsibilities, obligations and opportunities of the present. Now is the time to form real resolutions, repent of former errors and commence the new life.
3rd) Meditate upon the future. It may be out last year in this world. What are our hopes and prospects for the life that now is and that to come.


........ to be continued ........



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, May 14, 2017

The Conversations We Never Had ~ A Review


Image result
I was recently given the opportunity to read the book The Conversations We Never Had by Jeffrey H Konis. (Paperback, 208 pages Published May 3rd 2016 by Outskirts Press ISBN 1478767294) It is a fictitious account of the time he spent living with his grandmother and the conversations he never had; but wished he did.

I wasn't sure what to expect, and honestly it took me a little while to begin to read it. For some reason I thought it would be sad, or dry. It was neither and I'm now wondering why I was even hesitant.

This is a well written and thoroughly enjoyable book, I was drawn into Jeffinga's world immediately, looking forward to hearing more from Grandma Ola as she recanted her life while chain-smoking Newports. All the while thinking, regrettably, of the opportunities I squandered as well. Never thinking to ask the questions that plague me now as I write and research my own family history.

The cover photo was especially haunting - I found myself looking at it often as I read about the life and times of the family portrayed in the book. As the story unfolded it added greater context for me, as the reader, to put an actual face with the events.

I got the impression that the writing of the story was the catharsis Mr Konis required to work through his regret. In doing so he surely was brought closer to understanding the life and times of his Jewish ancestors in Poland during the time of the Holocaust. The writing of this book was clearly a labor of love and it shows in the story.

I recommend this book to anyone who likes a good story, whether having an interest in history, genealogy or family dynamic. It's a quick read, but a story that will stay with you and cause you to think about your own family and the conversations you might never have had.

From the back cover: "This is the dream of a grandson, who had taken his grandmother for granted, to have a second chance, the opportunity to learn about his family from the only person in the world who knew them, who remembered them. My father remembers nothing about his real parents for they were dead by the time he was nine. Olga, his mother's younger sister, survived the Holocaust, found my father hiding on a farm in Poland and later brought him to America to raise as her own. He never asked her any questions about his parents. Though I later moved in with Olga for a period of time, I repeated history and never asked her the questions my father never asked. Olga has been gone for more than twenty years, along with everything she could have told me, leaving me with a sense of guilt and profound regret. The Conversations We Never Had is a chronicle of my time spent with Grandma "Ola" and tells the stories she might have shared had I asked the questions."


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, May 13, 2017

Book Of The Week: The History of ... Massachusetts-Bay ...



The History of the colony of Massachusetts-Bay ...
Thomas Hutchinson
M. Richardson, 1765 - Massachusetts




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, May 12, 2017

Tools For The Dig: State Focused Research | Iowa


State Focused Research | Iowa


Some of my favorite research sites are slightly off-radar by today's definition.

First I'd like to talk about Genealogy Trails. From their homepage: "Our goal is to help you track your ancestors through time by transcribing genealogical and historical data and placing it online for the free use of all researchers. We are all about adding data for you to use in researching your family lines!!!We know that what you're looking for is data -- and we have LOTS of it right here.
Our hosts work continuously to bring you fresh, interesting and NEW data (well.... as new as hundred year old data can be!!!)" Pretty much everything you need to know to begin your Iowa research is contained within the pages of  Iowa Genealogy Trails. This is a thorough, well thought out site - and they are always looking for volunteers!

Companion Yahoo! Group: Genealogy Trails/Midwestern States

Next up, RAOGK. Another volunteer site. A treasure trove of links, well organized and easy to understand. From this site you can request look-ups from a team of Iowa volunteers. Or add you name to the volunteer list if Iowa is your home-base.

IAGenWeb is an oldie but a goody! Volunteer based also, this database was founded in 1996! From their home page: "IAGenWeb isn’t an ordinary genealogy website. Ordinary websites are those where text and sometimes pretty pictures are present, but trying to get in touch with a real person to help you with your research… impossible. The strength of IAGenWeb is its many volunteers, some of whom have spent over a decade assisting others with their Iowa research. Using our county page visit the Iowa county your ancestors lived in and first try and find any information the county may freely provide on their pages (most have some sort of search built in). If the particular fact isn’t available online, then reach out to the county coordinator (cc) and they will try and assist you as best they can. Most county coordinators have their email address available on their website, though some will use contact forms."

Linkpendium is another all around resource hub. So What is Linkpendium, Anyway? "Linkpendium is a 10,000,000+ resource directory to everything on the Web about families worldwide and genealogically-relevant information about U.S. states and counties. We cover both free and subscription sites, with a strong emphasis upon free resources provided by libraries, other government agencies, genealogical and historical societies, and individuals. We are particularly proud of our unique indexes to online biographies."

Cyndi's List Iowa page.


FamilySearch:
Iowa State Wiki
Iowa State Catalog
Iowa Online Genealogy Records


State societies and archives include:
Iowa Genealogical Society
State Historical Society of Iowa
Digital State Archives/Iowa
Iowa.Gov/Archives


A comprehensive list of newspapers can be found at The Ancestor Hunt's Iowa page.


For social context look at LOC Iowa Collection and Iowa Digital Library.


As I discover more resources I'll update this post. Do you have any Iowa favorites that I've missed? Please share!


©2017 Anne Faulkner - Ancestor Archaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Video Of The Week: How to break down brick walls after 1837


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!





©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, May 10, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | John Duncan Fraser and Anna Eliza Liddel

1880 John Fraser Family Tree
46. John Duncan Fraser (Hugh - 16, John - 4, Duncan - 1) born December 28th 1846 at Carlisle



married 1870 Northumberland, England



Anna Eliza Liddel birth not recorded



children of this union: (all born England)


i. John Alexander Fraser b. May 20th 1872

ii. Margaret Ann Fraser b. May 24th 1874

iii. Thomas Fraser b. June 6th 1876


Anna Eliza Liddel Fraser died October 11th 1880. John Duncan Fraser's death is not recorded.


note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Catherine Jane Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

Catherine Jane Faulkner (Joseph, James, William OR Priscilla, William, William) was born about 1826 in Orange Co, New York to parents (and first cousins) Joseph Faulkner and his wife Priscilla Faulkner.

Catherine Jane married John W Wells (born about 1825) about 1846 in Pennsylvania.


The couple had at least four children: (all born Pennsylvania)
  • Ada L Wells b. 23 Sep 1847 d. 13 Jan 1928 never married
  • Edith Wells b. 20 Aug 1853 d. 7 Aug 1936 m. Edward Wheeler no issue
  • Andrew Wells b. abt 1854 d. UNK
  • Bertha M Wells b. May 1864 d. 18 Feb 1949 m. John F Wheeler


John died sometime before 1870 I suspect, he is not listed on the census with Catherine and the children. The last census Catherine appears on is 1880, listed as widowed. 

The death dates and burial locations for Catherine and John are not known.



~This particular family line is proving to be very challenging, as you will see in the coming weeks. The family of Joseph and Priscilla Faulkner are showing to be elusive and vague. I intend to supply what I know, maybe something will ring a bell with someone.~


©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, May 8, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Rowley Lineage and Genealogy, Part 3


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.

Rowley Family Story con't ....

Joseph Rowley Jr. married Annie Beach in 1814 or 1815. Joseph Rowley was a personal friend of the French General Lafayette.

Joseph Rowley Jr b. 25 December 1788 in Victor, Ontario Co, NY
                             d. 7 July 1853 in Portage Co, OH
                             m. 1814/15 Annie Beach
                                                b. 20 March 1790 in Victor Ontario Co, NY
                                                d. 11 November 1867 in Mt Pleasant, IA

children include:

  • Rossiter Clark Rowley b. 18 July 1818 d. 10 July 1912  m. Rhoda Ann Vredenburgh
  • Loveland Thomas Rowley b. 1822 d. 1899 m. Rebecca Tullis


In 1828 Rossiter moved with his family (parents) to Portage Co, Ohio. At the early age of 17 years he decided upon his life's calling and was licensed to preach in 1838, and ordained a minister of the gospel in 1839. He moved to Putnam County, Indiana in 1838 and in November 1840 was married to Rhoda Ann Vredenburgh. Rossiter and Rhoda were married in Greencastle, Indiana by Bishop Amos. Five children were born to them.

Rossiter was a 'circuit' rider in the early days of residency in New York state. At twenty years he was ordained as minister in the Methodist church. When the families moved west and located in Iowa he transferred his membership to the Presbyterian church and as one of it's learned and consecrated ministers he did a wonderful work for the Master in several Iowa churches for 'nigh on forty years.

After ministering for a season in Indiana he moved to Illinois where he performed missionary work until 1876. The spring of that year he moved to Adams county. He organized the Presbyterian churches in Brooks and Nodaway and officiated as their pastor for twenty five years. In 1892 he was honorably retired from the ministry by the Presbytery of Corning and since that time has made his home with his daughter in this city.

Rev. Rowley, at the close of his first pastorate, acquired a tract of land a mile north of the courthouse where the Cuba road branches off from Main. It was timber and unbroken tract. Here Dr Rowley built for himself a neat little cottage. In 1852 and 1853 he had the land cleared and plowed. (the editor of the paper which carried this article - 'a mere little stinker of 15 then, drove the oxen that did the first plowing and helped to put out a considerable orchard' - one of our noblest pioneer ministers whom this editor numbers among his dearest childhood friends) [The Rowley family resided in Peoria, IL at this time]

Rev. Rowley was a remarkable old gentleman (he lived into his 95th year) retaining his facilities to a wonderful degree and kept posted in all the issues of the day and possibilities of the future. Dr Rowley was a scholarly brilliant man and many years ahead of his time in the interpretation of the scripture. He was a gentle and kindly person (undemonstrative for a Methodist minister). However his service to the Presbytery covered many years during which he organized churches throughout the state of Iowa; his last charges being at Brooks and Nodaway after which he was honorably retired by the Presbytery. He was a splendid citizen and a cherished friend of all people of the various churches and outside of them. He was one of the noblest pioneer ministers with a brilliant mind which he retained to the last. He was erect of stature and took daily walks to the post office in company of his big hunting dog; returning by way of the butcher's where there'd be a treat wrapped and carried home by "DON" before opening it.

Father Rowley was clear of speech and optimistic in his views. He attended the General Assembly as late as his 88th year. He viewed the famous Haley's comet for the second time in his 92nd year. Many remarkable and historical events occurred during Rossiter C Rowley's lifetime: he saw the railroads come into being (monstrous change from the covered wagon), witnessed the steamboat in its infancy, experienced the 'temperance movement' and often commented that 'it was like living, almost in another world'. And so it must have been; the railroads, telegraph, telephone 'all modern machinery' such as binding machine, binder mower, and thrashing machine came into being in his lifetime. Dr Rowley knew Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas; he often saw them practice. Mr Rowley lived through the 'abolition days' and knew all about the 'underground railroad'. As a lad Rossiter sat upon the knee of Lafayette (French statesman and general, known as the "Hero of the Worlds") and toyed with the brass buttons on his uniform (Lafayette served as major general in general George Washington's army during the American Revolution)

There are many interesting stories and happenings of this remarkable, loving, gentle ancestor's life. (I was privileged and fortunate to have known my great grandfather Rowley - ETPT) Father Rowley, a devout Christian forever in the service of his fellow man was called to the bedside of a dying parishioner. While driving along the dark road in his horse and buggy, the horse shied; Father Rowley controlled him and at the same time witnessed an apparition by the roadside. Continuing on the journey, he was met at the home and informed that his friend was dead. His death had occurred at the time that Father Rowley had witnessed the apparition while traveling to his home.

Rossiter died in Biggsville, Illinois while visiting his son ans daughter-in-law, being overcome by intense heat. He was met in Albia by his grandson Frank M Rowley and journeyed to Biggsville.


GENEALOGY

Rossiter Clark Rowley b. 7 July 1818 in Victor, NY
                                      d. 10 July 1912 in Biggsville, IL
                                      m. 29 September 1840 to Rhoda Ann Vredenburgh
                                                                              b. 4 March 1818 in Terre Haute, IN
                                                                              d. 10 December 1890 in Brooks, IA

children include:

  • Marcellus Mellville Rowley b. 1842 d. 1911 m. Drucilla Criss
  • Anne Elizabeth Rowley b. 1845 d. 1941 m. Wilcox
  • Flora Dell Rowley b. 11/12/1857 d. 12/13/1932 m. Jesse Louis Twining
  • Child FNU
  • Child FNU


Flora Dell Rowley b. 12 November 1857 in Peoria, IL
                                d. 13 December 1832 in Des Moines, IA
                                m. 25 October 1876 to Jesse Louis Twining
                                                                    b. 5 August 1850 in Washington, IA
                                                                    d. 8 April 1933 in Des Moines, IA

children include:

  • Carrie Elizabeth Twining b. 29 March 1881 d. 19 October 1969 m. Irving A Potwin
  • Anna Jeanette Twining b. 1883 d. 1918 m. E Earl Williams
  • Jessie Lois Twining b. 1885 d. 1977 m. Jacob Earl Hydeman
  • Merrick Carlyle Twining b. 1888 d. 1970 m. Edna Mae Peterson



 ***editor's note: this is a transcript of research completed in 1982 based on information available at that time. I have not yet researched this family further, but suspect there is more information/clarification available to us today. I will follow up at a future date with fresh data. ***



........ to be continued ........



©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Field Notes: Writing Out A Brick Wall


I started a new series recently. Brick Wall Ancestors. Thought it'd be good to release them out into the wild and do a little crowd-sourcing. If they are brick walls for me, they may be for someone else too. Well, wouldn't you know it, seeing as they are Brick Walls and all, truthfully I had not really looked into them recently.  Sure, I revisit them about once a year - mostly just looking for any new records that might have cropped up. Well, things change when you start to write a blog about it! Or maybe I should say, when you start to write about it. Period. Laying it out linearly, putting into words what I had and had not discovered just threw a monkey wrench into the whole thing! In a good way, mind you.

The thing with writing, with telling a tale, the story needs to progress. Getting from point A to point B needs logical explanation. Different than records only. Records confirm a fixed place in time. Handy to verify someone was somewhere sometime. BUT how did they get there? And why? Telling a non-fiction tale like we do with our ancestors requires research, logic, a knowledge of (then) current events and even laws of the time.

So, as I set out to write up my first Brick Wall Ancestor in story form I realized I had very little 'meat', which made me dig. And question. The facts that I had amassed (or not) would not adequately depict what I was trying to convey.

I began to think in new ways.

Which lead me to new discoveries.

Which broke my Brick Walls.

No, not all of them - but the first three I originally had planned on writing about gained parents, or a place of death, or two new generations of ancestors! Plus a whole slew of new places to travel to to really dig for additional clues. (Because we all know, only a fraction of records are available online!)

Here's what I learned:
  • Gather ALL your information before you begin writing. It's as much about debunking or negative evidence as it is about acquiring new positive information. 
  • Check the online databases frequently - you never know when some new record set will be digitized and available for viewing.
  • Utilize social media and online genealogy research groups. If you are researching in Ohio for example, but live in Kansas you could travel to Ohio yourself (you should, eventually) or you could find an appropriate online group and post your research questions there. Most of the groups are filled with people who have experience researching in that group's particular area.
  • Do you have three conflicting sources of birth location? Make sure the county boundaries didn't change, or the town itself didn't get renamed. (see below)
  • Use maps. Old maps, Google maps, county maps. I have a tab with Google maps open all the time when I research - I put in point A (say, Cleveland OH, for example) and point B (say, Chautauqua NY) It sounds like quite a distance in my head, but when I look at it on Google Maps I see it is a 135 mile straight shot. Not out of the question for 'commuter' travel in 1850. In my research case, Cleveland may have been the  closest big city to obtain goods and services. I also use the heck out of  the Atlas of Historical County Boundaries.
  • Fill in the years between the census with City Directories. Your ancestor might not turn up every year, but it gives you a clearer picture of their movements. And their occupations! Also, notice the neighbors. Immigrants especially tended to live near kin or countrymen - always another clue!
  • Check land records, marriage/church records and wills. Quite a number are digitized now, if you are unable to travel to your research location. FamilySearch has a great number of unindexed records to scroll through - from home - and even more if you visit a Family History Center in you area.
  • FAN research! Friends, associates and  neighbors. Sideways research always, always brings me new discoveries. 
  • Don't leave out newspapers and other forms of social context. Depending on where you are researching, newspapers can pre-date some other types of documentation.
  • Military records! Pensions, widow's pensions, muster rolls, battles - they all can hold a clue.  
  • Family lineage and Town history books. Google Books, Internet Archive, FamilySearch, Ancestry, WorldCat - there is a vast number of books that might contain the information you seek. My Faulkner lineage was 'hidden' in a book on the lineage of the Bull/Wells family. (Which I initially learned about from an online genealogy group
  • Question everything! Always ask 'why?' or 'How?'. Why did they attend church 50 miles and two counties away from their farm? How did they arrive where they did, and why did they leave?
  • Now, WRITE IT OUT! Write out everything you know. Tell a story. Start with the facts and fill in the blanks. You will end up with a more solid idea of where to research next, and you might just discover a hidden clue or two that will bring that Brick Wall crashing.  

I'm not going to say that this is necessarily easy - or quick. But if you have the desire to really break through a Wall or two then putting in the time, the 'leg-work', the hours of travel you will undoubtedly take down a rabbit hole or two is well worth it. Not to mention the personal satisfaction that comes from solving a 'cold case'.

Bring a flashlight  .... and snacks.


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, May 6, 2017

Book Of The Week: History of the Town of Goshen, CT




History of the town of Goshen, Connecticut: with genealogies and biographies based upon the records of Deacon Lewis Mills Norton, 1897

Augustine George Hibbard, Lewis Mills Norton
Press of the Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co, 1897 - Goshen (Conn.) - 602 pages




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, May 5, 2017

Photo Friday :: Happy Baby



This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!



Do you know me?
From the Mystery Collection
taken at Urlin & Becker in Cleveland, OH
back image below




©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, May 4, 2017

Video Of The Week: Start Your Family History Journey

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Four | Elizabeth Fraser and James Stewart

1880 John Fraser Family Tree
45. Elizabeth Fraser (Alexander - 14, William - 3, Duncan - 1) born August 3rd 1843 in New York



married December 27th 1864 at Chicago



James Stewart born June 24th 1842 Edinburgh, Scotland




children of this union: (all born Chicago)

i. Elizabeth Chalmers Stewart b. November 22nd 1865

ii. James Pringle Stewart b. June 11th 1868

iii. Margaret Pringle Stewart b. April 14th 1871

iv. Clarence Stewart b. April 15th 1874 d. April 15th 1874

v. Henry Clark Stewart b. January 7th 1876



James Stewart died April 18th 1880. Elizabeth Fraser Stewart's death was unrecorded.



note: Generation Four was (mostly) still living when the Original Tree was created.

~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | James Bull Faulkner {Gen 3}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

James Bull Faulkner (Joseph, James, William OR Priscilla, William, William) born June 28th 1824 in Orange Co, New York to parents (and first cousins) Joseph Faulkner and his wife Priscilla Faulkner.

James Bull married Susan Murdock (born in Ireland Nov 13th 1827) about 1850 in Pennsylvania.

The couple had at least 10 children: (all born Pennsylvania)
  • Mary Evaline Faulkner b. 1851 d. 1854
  • Franklin Wellington Faulkner b. Jan 1852 d. after 1920 never married
  • Louise Susan Faulkner b. Jan 1853 d. 4 Dec 1936 never married
  • Elizabeth Priscilla Faulkner b. 10 Mar 1854 d. 10 Mar 1892 m. Wm H Moyles
  • Martha Ann Faulkner b. May 1855 d. after 1930 never married
  • Evaline Faulkner b. 1858 d. before 1870
  • Clara J Faulkner b. 29 Jun 1860 d. 29 Feb 1892 never married
  • George Washington Faulkner b. 28 Nov 1862/3 d. 22 Mar 1906 never married
  • Charles Anderson Faulkner b. 26 Jul 1864 d. 31 Dec 1932 m. Beatrice Frances Silverstone
  • Sarah Margaret Faulkner b. 1867 d. after 1930 m. Clement H Beeson no issue 

James Bull Faulkner worked for the D & H Canal Company for 30 years. Perhaps this is what bought him to Pennsylvania.

James Bull Faulkner died November 18th 1901 in Carbondale, Pennsylvania. His wife Susan died Nov 13th 1893 also in Pennsylvania. They are buried in the Maplewood Cemetery in Carbondale with many of their children.


~This particular family line is proving to be very challenging, as you will see in the coming weeks. The family of Joseph and Priscilla Faulkner are showing to be elusive and vague. I intend to supply what I know, maybe something will ring a bell with someone.~


©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, May 1, 2017

Notes From My Grandmother | Rowley Lineage and Genealogy, Part 2


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


Rowley Family Story
~ the missing generations ~

I don't quite know what happened.  My grandmother had all the key players to put this family together. She had the first immigrants and their descendants. She followed the correct sons (for our lineage) for two generations. Then she missed the connection. The link was broken. She picked up three generations later and was able to qualify for the DAR. With the wrong Patriot mind you, but it's not entirely her fault. The family was/is confusing, what with all the Moseses and Josephs and all. Let's see if I can set it straight this week so we can get back to her story next week.

She stopped with Moses, son of Moses who was son of Henry, the original immigrant. (See, too many Moseses). Moses II (b. 1654) married Mary (LNU) he may have married more than one Mary. There are three surnames floating around Fletcher, Throop and Crippen. I can't say for certain if any of them are correct. The birth dates of the children (if accurate) might hint at more than one wife. Moses and his family removed to Connecticut from Massachusetts around 1700. The children are as follows: (all born at Barnstable MA except Jonathan born at East Haddam CT)
  • Mary b. 1677 d. 1755 m. Samuell Olmstead
  • Moses III b. 1679 d. 1735 m. Martha Porter
  • Ebeneezer b. UNK d. UNK (mentioned in father's will)
  • Naomi b. 1685 d. 1764 m. Samuel Fuller
  • Hannah b. UNK d. UNK (mentioned in father's will)
  • Samuel b. 1688 d. 1767 m. Elizabeth Fuller
  • John b. 1690 d. 1690 d. 1762 m. Deborah Fuller
  • Mehitabel  b. 1697 d. 1775 m. Henry Champion
  • Jonathan b. 1704 d. 1772 m. Anne Fuller

Seems lots of Rowleys (or Rowlee) married Fullers - just to confuse us more! And perhaps my grandmother got confused at this point. Her original Patriot, Joseph Langrill Rowley (not our ancestor) descended from Moses III and Martha, there is a lot of genealogy with this (incorrect) downline. She should have followed John and Deborah - that leads to Joseph (no middle name) Rowley, our ancestor.

John Rowley (born at Barnstable MA) married Deborah Fuller, daughter of John Fuller and Mehitabel Rowley (see there's that Rowley/Fuller thing again!) in Colchester CT and had the following children: (all born Colchester CT)
  • Patience b. 1717 d. UNK m. Richard Skinner
  • Content b. 1718 d. UNK m. Isaac Kneeland
  • Mindwell b. 1720 d. UNK m. Samuel Adams
  • Joseph b. 1722 d. UNK m. Susannah LNU
  • Sarah b. 1723 d. UNK m. Ebenezer Kneeland
  • Deborah b. 1725 d. UNK m. Daniel Adams
  • John Jr b. 1727 d. UNK m. Rebecca (Hurd) Brainard
  • Seth b. 1730 d. 1751

John Rowley Jr, son of  John Rowley and Deborah Fuller, married the widow Rebecca Brainard (maiden name Hurd) on September 4th 1752, in Colchester CT. According to the book "The genealogy of the Brainerd-Brainard family in America : 1649-1908" Rebecca had three children with her first husband; Abigail, James, and Ichabod Brainard, all born Connecticut. John and Rebecca had four children together, according to the above referenced book, also born in Connecticut. They are:
  • Joseph  b.1753 d. 1835
  • Mindwell b. 1755 d. UNK
  • Mary b. 1757 d. UNK m. Amos Miner
  • Seth b. 1759 d. UNK

Joseph Rowley born 15 June 1753, married first Sibbie Fox in Berkshire MA and had at least the following children - born Massachusetts (family trees show up to 12 children for this couple - I have not found solid proof and as it was not my direct line I put it on the back burner, for now):
  • Deborah b. 1774 d. 1860 m. Joseph Perkins
  • Jirah b. 1775 d.1844 m. (1)Elizabeth Brace (2)Mary Olmstead Gray - widow
He married second Hannah Loveland (THIS is where my grandmother's research resumes) February 1784/5 in Ontario NY, and had at least the following children: (all born Ontario NY)
  • Joseph Jr b. 1788 d. 1853 m. Anna Beach
  • Lucy b. 1791 d. 1878 m. John Pullen
  • Sylvia b. 1805 d. UNK m. Frederick A Hart

From a letter written to the Pension Office in 1903 from a descendant of Joseph's "Born in Colchester Conn 1752. Enlisted Oct 1775 in Revolutionary War and was in Col Simonds regiment with which he marched to Lake George thence to Ticonderoga. In 1776 he was in the same service under Col Ashley. During '78, '79 & '80 he frequently volunteered to go out on scouting service after Indians and Tories. Was injured in an accident. Died at Victor NY Dec 23 1835"

This family is particularly hard to sort out. I kept to my direct line with this post. There are children, I am sure, that aren't accounted for here. The Rowleys are a study unto themselves! As a matter of fact, I found this website as I was fact-checking. Bookmarked it for another day!

Next week we resume with my grandmother's research and notes.



........ to be continued ........


©2017 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980-82 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection