Friday, September 30, 2016

Photo Friday :: She Wore Velvet



This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!




"Aunt Prissie (Dicken) Junkin"
"taken late 1800's"
"child of Priscilla Ashby Twining's sister Elizabeth"


Note: the author of the label was incorrect. If this is Prissie Junkin, then her mother was Hester/Ester Ashby Dicken; another sister of Priscilla Ashby Twining; not Elizabeth.



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Video Of The Week: Five Things You Can Do This Weekend to Clean Up Your Family Tree

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Frasers of Fife: Generation Three | William Fraser and Christian Wishart

1880 John Fraser Family Tree

12. William Fraser (William - 3, Duncan - 1) born April 16th 1800 at Kinglassie


married May 10th 1839 at Kennoway


Christian Wishart born January 31st 1822 at Kennoway (Kings Mill and Tullibole Mills)


children of this union:


i. William Fraser b. July 31st 1841

ii. Margaret Agnes Chrichton Fraser b. March 10th 1851



William died June 3rd 1868
Christian's death is not recorded


~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Finding Faulkner: Extra! Extra! Serendipity Strikes, Again!

It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Wednesday morning, September 21st, 2016. Sitting in the Cave, as usual, preparing to write a sketch about James Faulkner. I thought I had all the facts. I thought I had collected all the evidence. I was happily tapping away at the keyboard, minding my own business, painting a picture of James' life, as I had come to know it.

On a whim I decided to pop over to his Find A Grave page, pasted there was a great deal of information on him; snippets from books, his obituary. Easier to review it all in one place, I though to myself. Years ago the town historian had created his memorial, added everything she knew, including the fact that the actual location of his grave was unknown. The records having been destroyed by fire in 1929. No marker could be found. Over the years I had placed marker requests anyway, hoping someone could ferret something out. They always returned the same results. Exact location unknown. No marker. "Walked the entire cemetery, found nothing". Couldn't find his wife either, for that matter.

Okay. Fine.

Someday, I promised myself, I'd go there and personally look for James. Grass Lake, MI isn't really all that far from Chicago. "Something" told me it just wasn't a lost cause. He was a war veteran. There was an odd bit of documentation I had unearthed at one point as to his burial location. The cemetery had changed names since then, but still..... Carrying on, I didn't give it another thought.

Then Wednesday happened.

Opening James' memorial page, I was greeted with the most magnificent sight! His grave marker!


And it was BIG! How was this missed??? After weeping, and doing a little Cave whooping, perhaps some delighted screaming - the neighbors may have wondered what all the celebratory hollering was about - I wrote a note to the Angel who found this Holy Grail.

His name is Vern.

He wrote right back. "I know exactly where it is by the photo I took before. It's at the front of the cemetery just off the road. I was facing east when I took it. I didn't understand why it was marked "no marker"; being so big."

Exactly!! Another case of a Faulkner hiding in plain sight. Seems we're good at it.

I told Vern that a trip to Grass Lake was now on my sort list - this I needed to see with my very own eyes. He wrote back "If you need any help when you get here, just give me a call and I will take you right to them."

(Oh, Vern. You are an Angel!)

Around the marker are not only James, but Martha, his wife. (Who, incidentally, has her OWN marker next to this one!) Their daughter Fannie and James' brother David!

These photos had been quietly sitting on Find A Grave since May 21st - four months to the day!

There are days when I am so frustrated with Find A Grave that I'm 'fixin' to quit' - and others, like Wednesday, when it is my new best friend. As with anything else, I suppose, it's the people who make the difference. Vern is good people. A Find A Grave angel.

I've been most fortunate on this quest to be helped, many times over, by kind souls who just love genealogy and history and merely want to help any way they can. Humbled by all the unrequested help that has come my way, I look for ways to Pay it Forward every chance I get.

And, oh my yes! A trip to Grass Lake is being planned - it's a short 4 1/2 hour drive from the Cave, the fall colors will be beautiful ........ can't wait!


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Monday, September 26, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 7


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN


Irving Augustus Potwin was the second son of three and had two sisters (one died in infancy). He was born in Corning, Adams Co, Iowa and received elementary education there and attended the Academy also. He went to University at Northfield, Minnesota. The stories of severe winters there were often topics of conversation. Before the winter months many structures were erected, which appeared to be scaffolds, over all the walkways; one who lives through a winter in snow country is familiar with 'snow fences'; but these strange looking skeletons were a puzzle until the snow storms arrived. Students and all residents walked 'on top' of the snow by way of the high stilts. Irving studied the classics as well as mathematics and business courses.

During vacations and time in his home town he courted his future bride, Carrie Elizabeth Twining (Bess). They both had attended the Academy in Corning. Irving's sister, who was nine years older than he, was influential in securing admission to Northfield for him. Gertrude had taught classes there. The courtship really began when Bess and Irv walked home together from the Academy. Bess attended three years, Irv for two before he went to Minnesota.

Bess and Irv grew up in the same community, attended the same Sunday school and church. Bess said, "I used to see him in the Presbyterian Sunday school (Irv's father was the superintendent there) and Irv would rest on the roof of the woodshed. I'd often see him for he would ride his huge bicycle and that was the way he'd get off it." The bicycles in those days had the great big front wheel and tiny wheel in the back. Irv would often ride into the yard of Bess's home.

Carrie Elizabeth and Irving Augustus Potwin were married in the Twining home, Corning, Polk Co, Iowa on January 3, 1899. The bride and groom made their home in Corning until after the birth of their first child.

Irv heard of an opportunity in Oklahoma (then a new territory, not yet a state, opening up). Along with a friend, Mr. Nelson, left to establish a home for his family. Misfortune overtook him; he was taken ill while there. He was extremely ill; he contracted smallpox; and returned to Corning upon recovery. However Irv realized that there was opportunity in the new settlement and moved with his wife and daughter in the year 1901. They established their home in Guthrie.

Irv's friend Gus was a carpenter and Irv took up the painter's trade; there was plenty of work to keep them occupied in the new community. A second child was born there, a little boy, Kenneth Grayden, April 10, 1902.

Later on Irv started a water service (still a new settlement) hauled barreled water and delivered it to the homes. Oklahoma was very dry and barren, Bess would 'sweep' the yard around their little home; no grass would grow to make a lawn. Bess and Irv were really pioneers in a new territory.

There was an opening for a cashier in the bank. Since Irv was an excellent mathematician; one of the subjects he had mastered in college; he was asked to fill the position and filled the need of the bank and so started a new profession. Once again Gus Nelson was influential in Potwin's future, a very devoted friend.

The next year Irv moved his wife Bess and young family to Des Moines. Again his devoted friend had heard of an opening in a bank there. Irv applied for the job as cashier of the Des Moines National Bank which was later the Iowa National Bank and he was hired. Potwin [built] his home on Capitol Hill in Des Moines for his family. It was here that their third child was born in 1904. They moved into a larger house on College Avenue. It was from here that the eldest child entered school.

The little son was taken ill with the dreaded disease measles and died from the aftermath of complications.

A few years later Irv planned and built a new two story house for his [family] in a new development, know as 'Middlesex', in the western section of Des Moines, Iowa. There was much open country and with the feeling of freedom and being close to nature. It was here that the youngest began her schooling. The two sisters trudged through all kinds of weather, four times a day.

They established themselves as good neighbors and solid citizens. They became affiliated with the Congregational church.

Irv was a outdoor man and enjoyed sports. On his property he had a fine clay court constructed for tennis. The streets were being paved at this time and Irv had the steam roller (used in road construction) driven on the court and made an excellent firm court. He and Bess would go north in the fall on a hunting trip. He had many trophies. Also the couple enjoyed their social life with friends; cards and dancing principally. Bess would carry her dainty little dancing slippers in the satin bag (one never walked in dancing slippers!).

Irv went into his own business, that of certified public accountant.

During World War I everyone planted 'Victory Gardens'. Irv had the tennis [court] plowed up and it was turned into a potato field. After the war was over and the Armistice signed life returned to more normal living. Irv built another beautiful new house just next door, where there had once been the tennis court that joined the war effort as a potato field. Many happy years of living made the house a home. His daughters were married. He gave a home to Bess's mother and father after his retirement in his home now devoid of children.

After many years of love and service to his devoted family he died in 1938, August 16, as he was preparing to enter his automobile for a usual day. There was no suffering or pain of illness now.



GENEALOGY

Irving Augustus Potwin b. 3/9/1880
                                         d. 8/16/1938
                                          m. 1/3/1899 to Carrie Elizabeth Twining

children:
Dorothy Irene b. 7/24/1899 d. ----- m. 6/18/1924 to Albert H. Adams
                                                               Children:
                                                                John Irving Adams
                                                                Richard Albert Adams
                                                                Elizabeth Ann Adams
                                                                Thomas Louis Adams
Kenneth Grayden b. 4/10/1900 d. 12/1908
ELIZABETH TWINING b. 10/28/1904 d. ----- m. 5.25.1923 to Robert Willis Thomas
                                                                                      b. 5/3/1904 d. 5/25/1955
                                                                                Children:
                                                                                  Robert Willis Jr. b. 2/14/1924
                                                                                  Barbara Jeanette b. 5/2/1931
                                                                                  William Irving b. 7/30/1933
                                                                                  Elizabeth Alice b. 9/21/1936
                                                                                  Kenneth Lauren (died in infancy)


Married in Corning, Iowa moved to Guthrie, Oklahoma with wife and first born before she was a year old. He moved his family to Des Moines, Iowa after birth of their son. There another daughter was born.



END of Part 7


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, September 25, 2016

Field Notes: Are Facebook Groups In Your Tool Kit?



Facebook is a great genealogy resource. I'm on Facebook all the time. But not in they way many people are "on Facebook". I don't actually remember the last time I "went on" Facebook to browse my news feed. My husband likes to scroll through his while watching TV and, thinking I'm on Facebook ALL DAY, he asks "did you see this?", "I suppose you already knew that?"

Well, no. Actually.

If I'm in a particular mind-set, I might retort "I did find this great new source for Ulster County land records" or "I 'met' the great, great granddaughter of my 3rd great grandmother's son by her first marriage" And watch as his eyes glaze over as he returns to his scrolling, mumbling something like "wow, that's great".

I'm talking Groups! Facebook groups! Oh how I love them! What a wonderful resource. A brilliant place to network with like minded researchers. Or experts. Or historical and genealogical societies. And, travel around the globe without leaving your chair!

Got a Brick Wall? Take it to a group! Just started using RootsMagic and have some questions? Take them to a group! Working on a theory and need some feedback? Yup ..... take it to a group!

I belong to over 100 various genealogical groups. (I was a bit shocked to learn this ...) Some are for research, some are for software and technology, some are for blogging. Some are just social. (Where else are you going to find people who "get" you and you're crazy genealogy 'addiction'?) If you're doing research in New Jersey, for instance, there's a group for that! Want to join/already belong to DAR? There's a group for that. Mayflower descendant? French Canadians? Adoptees? There are state-specific groups, county-specific groups, even city-specific groups. There are so many choices! Doing Prussian research? (sorry) there are a few great groups for that.

I'm not going to go into detail about how to find, or join groups. I suspect you are all pretty savvy when it comes to ferreting things out. (Just put in "'whatever you are looking for' genealogy" in the Facebook search bar) Besides, there are helps right on Facebook to walk you through. I would suggest that once you've joined a group, under 'notifications' click on 'all posts' or 'highlights', depending on your needs. I switch back and forth. If I'm concentrating my research in Orange County, New York, for example, then I want to receive ALL notifications from the related groups. If I belong to the Prussian group (I do), but I'm not currently working on a Prussian line, I usually choose 'highlights'. I still get some notifications, but I'm not pinged with every post.

So, yes. I am on Facebook all day. I consider it a valuable tool in my research kit. And you should too! (Just don't ask me if I saw "hey cat" ..... my eyes will glaze over as I stare at you blankly)



I'd love to learn what your favorite Facebook groups are, and/or if you've made any discoveries with the aid of a Facebook group. Please share in the comments!




©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Book Of The Week: History of the Railroads and Canals of the United States vol. 1



History of the Railroads and Canals of the United States ..., Volume 1
By Henry Varnum Poor

published 1860





©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, September 23, 2016

Photo Friday :: A Dapper Gentleman



This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!




"Uncle Milt Dicken"
"Washington IA"
"taken about 1870"



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Video Of The Week: Mining the Treasures in Newspapers

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Frasers of Fife: Generation Three | John Fraser and Ann Brown


1880 John Fraser Family Tree
11. John Fraser (William - 3, Duncan - 1) born January 3rd 1798 - at Mildeans Mill. John was a  Farmer at Westmill, Strathmiglo - 1824 to 1875


married August 1827 at Abernethy.


Ann Brown born July 25th 1804. Daughter of Gilbert Brown and Ann Williamson of Abernethly.




Children of this union:

35. i. William Fraser b. July 28th 1828, married Eliza Fairbairn

36. ii. Gilbert Fraser b. December 15th 1829, married Mary Cargill

      iii. John Fraser b. June 24th 1824

37. iv. James Fraser b. July 13th 1836, married Mary Buckley

38. v. Ann Fraser b. December 20th 1837, married James Winton

      vi. Agnes Fraser b. May 24th 1839 d. April 9th 1856

39. vii. David Fraser b. September 5th 1841, married Mary Kydd Finlay

40. viii. Robert Alexander Fraser b. October 11th 1843, married Catherine Oliphant

41. ix. Jessie Fraser b. February 16th 1846, married David Wightman Cargill



John died February 24th 1875
Ann died April 14th 1888


~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1880 John Fraser - Scotland

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Finding Faulkner: Examining The Will Packet, Part 2


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.



THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WILLIAM FAULKENDER
The Surrogate's Letter




Ulster County}

Be it remembered that on the Twenty Third Day of December One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty Four, personally came and appeared before me Joseph Gutherie, Surrogate of the said County, Ebenezar Clark of the Precinct of the Wall Kill in said County, Farmer. And being duly sworn on his oath declared the he did see William Faulkender sign and seal the written instrument here unto annexed purporting to be the will of said William Faulkender bearing date the Eleventh Day of September in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty Three. And heard him publish and declare the same as and for his last will and testament that at the time thereof he the said - William Faulkender was of sound disposing mind and memory to the best of the knowledge and belief of him the deponent. And that his name subscribed to the said will in his proper handwriting which he subscribed as witness to the said will in the testators presence. And that he the deponent saw James Caldwell and John Dill the other witnesses to the said will subscribe their names as witnesses thereto in the testators presence.


Joseph Gutherie, Surrogate


Ulster County}

Pursuant to the trust reposed in me I have admitted William Faulkender, of the Precinct of Wall Kill in said County, Farmer, a son of William Faulkender, late of the Precinct of Wall Kill aforesaid, Farmer deceased, Administrator of the said William Faulkender deceased, with his will annexed, the said William Faulkender having been duly sworn and given bond before me this day. - - - Given under my hand the Twenty Third Day of December in the year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty Four.


Joseph Gutherie, Surrogate



The takeaway:

  • William Faulkner died sometime between September 11th 1783 and December 23rd 1784. 
  • William Faulkner, Jr was appointed administrator.
  • Ebenezar Clark was the only witness to appear before the Surrogate.
Anything else I'm missing?



NEXT: the Will Letter


©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, September 19, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 6


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

Monroe Augustus Potwin was born in Ellington New York. He was the youngest living child. He received his education there.

He cared for the home place when his brothers went to the war (CIVIL WAR) as his father has died several years earlier.

Monroe was a professor in mathematics, Latin and other subjects; he was an instructor at the Academy of Ellington, where his future bride was a pupil of his. They were married the first day of January in 1866.

Ella Augusta Burt was born near Cleveland, Ohio in 1850; Ohio was a state at that time. But New York was a long way to go to a university in those days.

Ella's father was a Captain in the army. There is nothing known of her mother. The family owned woolen mills in Cleveland.

Interested in art, literature and music; Ella received a fine education in all -- "early studies prosecuted in Ellington Academy in New York". She married Monroe Potwin.

The couple went to Des Moines thinking to settle there but returned to Corning, Adams County, Iowa. It was a new settlement where [a] great deal of building was in progress. Monroe took up a trade, as a painter in this now growing settlement. 'Upon their arrival in Corning, seeing a big white house on a hill' decided that was where he would make his home. Little did they know then it was to be there home for a third of a century.

Soon after arriving they joined the Presbyterian church. They were both active in Sabbath school and missionary work. They each taught classes; Monroe was superintendent of Sunday School and also lead the singing. They both had beautiful voices. Both Monroe and Ella had been very well educated. He excelled in mathematics but "I recall him standing up in front, a bewhiskered good looking gentleman, leading in the songs" (comment of C.B. Potwin). Ella A. B. Potwin was a charter member of the women's club.

Monroe and Ella probably made the trip west by train, it came as far west as Indianola and/or Creston Iowa. Their infant Inez died en-route. (1869) She was buried in Ottumwa (one record says Osceola). There were four other children, Gertrude, Archie, Irving and Cyrus.

Ella preceeded her husband in death, in 1902. She had been ill for some time; her daughter came home to care for her (Gertrude was a professional musician in New York and Europe) while she was ill. Ella was taken to [the] hospital in Chicago for an operation (cancer) in the fall. However death came to Ella in her home in Corning, Iowa the early part of 1902.

In a letter from Monroe's sister Elizabeth in the month of May 1917 (she lived in Independence, Iowa) "I have four weeks -- garden in -- coming -- snow storm --. Hope you're feeling better -- Elsie not as well (Elsie, uncle M.'s wife). You do well to write without glasses. (his age 80 years).

Monroe died later that same year.


GENEALOGY

Monroe Augustus Potwin b. 8/28/1837
                                          d. 8/29/1917
                                            m. 1/1/1866 to Ella Augusta Burt
                                                                      b. 1850
                                                                      d. 1902

children:
Inez Theresa b. 8/1/1867 d. 1869
Gertrude Miriam b. 2/15/1869 d. UNK 
Archie Willard b. 3/27/1871 d. 8/21/1885
IRVING AUGUSTUS b. 3/9/1880 d. 8/16/1938 m. 1/3/1899 to Carrie Elizabeth Twining
Cyrus Burt b. 1/13/1892 d. 11/?/1952 m. Carol Joy Perry (Perey) near Remote, Oregon
                                                      

The boyhood home of Monroe, his brothers and sisters (they were 12) was in Ellington, Chautauqua Co, New York. Later he was an instructor at Ellington Academy where he met his future bride. (She was one of his students) They went west in 1869 with infant daughter, who died in Ottumwa (or Osceola) Iowa. (1 year). Monroe being the youngest cared for the homeplace and his mother while the others went off to war (Civil War).



END of Part 6



(Editor's note: you can read my post about Monroe HERE and Ella HERE)


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection



Sunday, September 18, 2016

Try-It! Illinois Returns October 1st

Try-It! Illinois Webpage Screenshot


It's my favorite time of year!!

Well, no, not really, I'm a summer gal - but if I have to stay inside, what better way than exploring the massive offerings on Try-It! Illinois. I lock myself in the Cave for this event and download like a mad woman.

Bad news? You must be an Illinois resident. If you are not an Illinois resident, stop reading right now, it will only make you sad!

From their website: "Welcome to Try-It! Illinois 2016, the seventeenth annual statewide database trial, sponsored by Secretary of State and State Librarian Jesse White and the Illinois State Library. Try-It! Illinois offers the staffs and library users of the more than 5,000 ILLINET member libraries the opportunity to survey and evaluate a wide variety of electronic resources. Thanks to the partnerships between the Illinois State Library and the participating electronic resource vendors, there is no charge for accessing these databases during Try-It! Illinois."

Try-It! Illinois returns for it's annual limited engagement October 1st through November 30th. Visit the site before hand and request your "secret" log-in information.  (Note: "We ask that you not post the Try-It! Illinois login and password on the Internet, on Web sites or in publicly archived e-newsletters.")

Click on the Participants link to view this years players.

Click on the Databases link to preview this fount of knowledge that will open up on October 1st. (The links won't be live until then, but you can browse)

My favorite collection is the ProQuest series - the Sanborn Maps alone I could spend a month on! I have not had the time to explore all the offerings in years past - the collection is vast and rich with variety.

I plan to do some digging in the historical section this year, (Daily Life Through History caught my eye already) and utilize the newspaper offerings, including Newspapers.com and NewspaperARCHIVE. MyHeritage and Fold3 will also be available, in their library editions, during this 'open house'.

Of course, this is bigger than genealogy (gasp!) There are science and technology sections, poetry, films, music, comics and graphic novels ..... well, you'll need to look for your self.

Good thing October 1st is a Saturday this year. If you call in sick on October 3rd I won't tell!

Happy Hunting!



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Saturday, September 17, 2016

Book Of The Week: History of the Class of 1868: Yale College



History of the Class of 1868: Yale College, 1864-1914
By Yale University. Class of 1868






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Friday, September 16, 2016

Photo Friday :: Out Front


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!



A mystery photo!
A picture postcard with nothing written on the back.
I suspect this is the Irons family of Chicago Illinois.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Video Of The Week: An Introduction to TopoView




We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos,
you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!



A tutorial by USGS scientist and topoView developer Chris Garrity demonstrating how to use topoView to access maps from the USGS.




©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Frasers of Fife: Generation Three | Duncan Fraser and Allison Grieve Forsyth

1880 John Fraser Family Tree

10. Duncan Fraser (William - 3, Duncan - 1) born February 4th 1794 at Kinghorn Parish - Farmer, Middle Mill

married November 24th 1824

Allison Grieve Forsyth born January 13th 1806


Children of this union:


      i. William Fraser b. October 14th 1825 d. May 21st 1847 - Engineer

      ii. James Fraser b. July 16th 1827 d. November 13th 1855 - Engineer

      iii. John Fraser b. May 10th 1829 d. October 4th 1821

      iv. Eleanor Brown Fraser b. December 10th 1830 m. John Wyllie - Merchant Captain

      v. Agnes Fraser b. March 14th 1833 d. September 22nd 1834

      vi. Alexander Fraser b. April 28th 1835

34. vii. Agnes Bane Fraser b. September 14th 1838 m. James Porteous Scott

      viii. Hugh George Fraser b. January 1841 d. March 1841

      ix. John Fraser b. February 14th 1842 d. August 1st 1843

      x. Hugh Fraser b. December 25th 844


Duncan died November 2nd 1869 - 75 3/4 years old
Allison died January 9th 1881 ay Mitchelston - 75 years old




~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Finding Faulkner: Examining The Will Packet, Part 1


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.



THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WILLIAM FAULKENDER




In the name of God amen. I William Faulkender of the Precinct of Wallkill, County of Ulster and State of New York, being weak in body but of sound disposing mind and memory (blessed be God) do this Eleventh day of September in the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty three Make and Publish this my last will and Testament in manner and form following (that is to say) Imprimis I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it me and my body to the Earth from whence it came in the hopes of a joyfull resurrection threw the merrits of my saviour Jesus Christ, and as for that worldly estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me I dispose there of as follows ~ First I give and bequith unto my loving wife Mary Faulkender the use of the two back rooms in my House I now live in with a bed and furniture and also her maintenance, together with the use of a horse and saddle for and during the term of her natural life. Item, I give and devise unto my son James Faulkender the Farm he now lives upon and to his heirs and assigns forever Providing he pay all such Debts and Incumberances as doth arise from said place whither from Purchase or otherways. And Providing he shall convey to his Youngest son when he shall arrive to the age of Twenty one Years that Part of said farm formerly occupied by my son Joseph while alive ~ And provided further that he shall give the proffits and benefits arising from said last mentioned farm to such of my children as may then be possessed of the Place or farm I now live upon for and during the term of six years after my decease and no longer. Item, I give and devise unto my son William Faulkender Jnr the farm adjoining the wallkill which I now live upon and to his heirs and assigns forever.  Item, I give and devise to my said son William one fifty acre lott on the Long Hill and two hundred acres of my undivided part of that lott of one thousand acres lying in or about the Pine Swamp and to his heirs and assigns for ever. Also I bequeath unto my said son William all my Personal Estate Providing he pay all such Debts and Incumberances as may arise or be due from the said last mentioned divised land. Item, I devise and give unto my son Samuel Faulkender the farm he now lives upon together with one fifty acre lott on the Long Hill and also two hundred acres of my undivided part of that lott of one thousand acres in or about the Pine Swamp aforsaid and to his heirs and assigners forever. Provided he pay all such Debts and Incumberances as may arise or be due out of said last mentioned divised land by Purchase or otherways.

  Lastly I do hereby invoke and declare to be utterly null and void all former wills and testaments that may have been made by me declaring this alone to be my last will and testament. In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal as being my said last will consisting of  one sheet and do publish and declare it as the same this Day and Year first above written - -- .                        his
William  X   Faulkender
mark and seal   


Signed Sealed Published and 
declared by the said William 
Faulkender as and for his 
last Will and Testament in the 
Presence of us whos names are 
here under Written.

James Caldwall
John Dill
Ebenezar Clark




The takeaway:

  • Mary's maiden name is not given, proving the notation on Find A Grave incorrect.
  • William had at least four adult sons, three still living at time of writing. 
  • Other children were referred to as possibly living in the family home, which leaves open the possibility of further research.
  • Mary remained in the marital home, which was given to son William Jr, a possible research lead.
  • William was illiterate, ending all speculation that the spelling of the surname in this document is a true and accurate representation of the actual spelling.
  • There's a bunch of acreage unaccounted for in the Pine Swamp.
  • How big was the lot on the Long Hill?
Anything else I'm missing?



Next: the Surrogate's Letter



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, September 12, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 5


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.



A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

Benjamin, fourth son of Thomas and Martha Potwine who had ten children, lived in Connecticut. (One source says place of Benjamin's birth as New York state. Born 1788)

The Dutch settled New York; they established  a colony in Albany. Many Puritan families in Massachusetts and Connecticut drifted south into New York about 1640. In 1740 the population was established at only 50,000. About that time many former Connecticut dwellers went across the sound and settled in Long Island.

Benjamin Potwine married Cornelia Curtis (Custus). There were twelve children; three died in infancy. It is known Ben, the eldest son lived in Ellington, New York. There were four living sons; the youngest, Monroe, who remained home to care for his mother and the homestead while the others went to war. The father had died eight years earlier. In the family records it tells of the boyhood home of Monroe, youngest in the family, in Ellington, Chautauqua county, New York.


GENEALOGY

Benjamin Potwine  b. 7/24/1788
                              d. 8/26/1852
                              m. 6/25/1816 to Cornelia Curtis (Custus)
                                                         b. 1/28/1798

Children:
Daughter b. 5/6/1817 d. 5/16/1817
Cornelia M. b. 8/4/1818 d. 1889/90 - m. 1838 to J. Birdsell Nygent
Benjamin C. b. 7/25/1820 d. 2/28/1905 - m. 8/3/1842 to Susan Torry (Ben lived in  Ellington, NY)
Martha C. b. 1/8/1823 d. 2/23/1873 - m. 6/20/1854 to Benjamin Franklin Fuller
Son b. 4/4/1825 d. 4/4/1825
Sarah Ann b. 4/17/1826 d. 3/25/1858 -m. 4/11/1848 to Wm. Watch Jr.
Mary A. b. 5/10/1829 d. 9/16/1888 - m. 8/6/1855 to Simon Lawrence
William Stiles. b. 6/9/1831 d. UNK - m. 10/23/1854 to Elsie M. Barnes
Junius F, b. 6/24/1833 d. UNK - m. 1/1/1859 to Helen A.
Elizabeth H. b. 8/6/1835 d. UNK - m. 5/21/1855 to Franklin Hammond
MONROE AUGUSTUS b. 8/28/1837 d. UNK - m. 1/1/1866 to Ella Augusta Burt
                                                                                         b. 10/10/1850 d. 3/26/1902
Son b. 11/1/1840 d. 11/1/1840


Believe this is the generation where the final 'e' was dropped.



END of Part 5


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Book Of The Week: Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania



Welsh Settlement of Pennsylvania
By Charles Henry Browning

"The author follows hundreds of Welsh pioneers into Pennsylvania via the records of the various land companies who re-settled William Penn's famous grant of land along the Schuylkill River. For sources, he utilizes lists of settlers, land patents, plat maps, and biographical sketches to flesh out the process of settlement in Merion and the adjacent towns of Haverford and Radnor.Still other important features are a study of the sometimes strained affairs between Welsh Tract settlers and William Penn, various personal accounts by the settlers, and a history of the Quaker meetings founded within the Welsh Tract."




©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, September 9, 2016

Photo Friday :: Mrs. Bryson


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!


"Mrs Bryson"
"(Nettie Bickford)"
"(Aunt Nettie)"
"Niece of Priscilla Ashby Twining"


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Video Of The Week: Ancestry Academy - Finding Your Military Veterans on Fold3

We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!




Ancestry Academy - Finding Your Military Veterans on Fold3

"Fold3 is a great resource to discover historic military documents and can be used to learn and share the story of the veterans in your family tree. In this course you will study the fundamentals and guidelines to successful searching and browsing on Fold3, as well as the value of different types of military documents and what information they can provide. We will delve into the different military records and talk about the fun facts you might find while researching the veterans in your family."

Watch the full course here.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Frasers of Fife: Generation Three | Helen Fraser and George Galloway

1880 John Fraser Family Tree

9. Helen Fraser (William - 3, Duncan -1) born 1791 at Fife


married October 18th 1814


George Galloway born October 12th 1790



children of this union:


      i. Agnes Galloway b. October 14th 1816 d. June 1836

      ii. Isabella Galloway b. March 25th 1823 d. March 6th 1839

33. iii. James Galloway b. November 25th 1827 married Catherine McKenzie


Helen died November 19th 1846
George died April 3 1851




~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Col William Faulkner {Gen 1}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Col William Faulkner, Jr was born to William and Mary 27 Aug 1746, according to the Goodwill Memorial book. Actually, the author did not want to assign William and Mary as Col William's parents, but I feel confident in doing so after concluding my own research. I have amassed a great deal of evidence supporting this, and plan, at some time in the future, to do a more in depth study of the Colonel. William was born in Wallkill, Ulster Co, New York and was the youngest son of William And Mary Faulkner.

William married Jane Rogers on the 1st of June 1779, at the Goodwill Presbyterian Church in Montgomery.

To them were born seven children, two sons and five daughters, (all Town of Wallkill):


  • Esther Faulkner b. 1780
  • Susan Faulkner b. 1782 
  • Priscilla Faulkner b. 1782 b. 1791
  • William J Faulkner b. 1784
  • Jane Faulkner b. 1786 d. UNK - spinster
  • Martha Faulkner b. 1788 d. 1859 - spinster
  • Thomas E Faulkner b. 1790
From An Outline History of Orange Co by Saml. Eager: "During the war of the Revolution this town was patriotic and nobly bore her share in public duty. Col. William Faulkner - then a captain - was in the service at the taking of Fort Montgomery by the English, and received a bayonet wound in the side, which afflicted him more or less through life, though he lived to be an old man. He was brave, fearless and a true patriot."

Col William Faulkner Jr died 31 Dec 1831 at the age of 86. He is buried at the Goodwill Presbyterian Churchyard in Montgomery, Orange Co, New York.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved



Monday, September 5, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 4


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

Thomas Potwine, the first son of the three children born to Reverend Thomas Potwine and Abigail Moseley, 1756. This Thomas married Martha Stiles, both lived in Connecticut - East Windsor - 1776. Thomas had seven brothers and sisters by his father's second marriage. It is through Thomas and Martha Potwine that my lineage continues to this generation (children of my marriage - E.T.P.T. and R.W.T. - 1923)

A Potwine homestead was built at this period in history; it is now almost 200 years old (if it is yet standing). It was located neat the Connecticut river 'big river' as spoken of by the Indians. There were tribes (families) of friendly Indians who were happy to have the settlers come to this land. No land was 'taken' from them, it was obtained by barter or gifted. Often the Chiefs would give their friends land extending "a day's walk" into the wilderness, west of the 'big river'. This colony of settlers was most fortunate. Three generations of Potwins lived in the old 'homestead' in East Windsor until 1963. Today the Connecticut river is but a mile from the Potwine homestead.

One Potwine (John 2) settled in Hartford CT, the rest settled around their Protestant church, which is now East Windsor. It is to Dorchester Colony on Massachusetts Bay that a clear line of ancestry can be traced and verified for the Potwin family in America. Governor Bradford (Mass.) made trips to the Conn. river; then called the "Great River" and found it a fine place. In 1631 there were many small tribes of Indian, most friendly and asked the white man to establish settlements in their territory. The Indians wanted rifles; so Governor Winthrop and Governor Bradford having no desire to fight Indian battles agreed. But later on the people wanted to move farther west, venturing into wilderness so the Plymouth Colony and the Massachusetts Bay Colony decided to move to Connecticut. In 1635 there were neighbors in Hartford and other settlements; so the move west was begun as more and more settlements on the east coast became towns and cities of the future United Stated of America.


GENEALOGY

Thomas Potwine Jr b. 1756
                                  d. 1824
                                  m. 1776 Martha Stiles
                                                b. 1760
                                                d. 1822

Children:
Martha b. 10/9/1779 d. UNK - m. Simon Barker of East Windsor, CT
Thomas b. 1/17/1784 d. 2/24/1869 - m. 1828 Sarah Stoughton, East Windsor, CT
                                                           m. 1899 Margaret Bartlett, East Windsor, CT
Israel b. 3/23/1786 d. 5/14/1864 - m. 1825/28 Mary F Potwine
John b. 8/17/1787 d. 5/7/1859 - m. 1811 Mary Benton of Tolland, CT
BENJAMIN b. 7/24/1788 d. 8/16/1852 - m. 1816 Cornelia Curtis (Custus)
Abigail b. 9/24/1790 d. 4/24/1872 - m. Dr Allen Porter, East Windsor, CT
Lydia b. 11/9/1792 d. 9/9/1826 - m. Wm Wright, Troy, NY
William b. 2/1/1795 d.4/17/1877 - m. 1825 Amelia Speer of Ellington, NY
Nathaniel b. 1/4/1798 d. 4/18/1854 - m. Sophia Clark of East Windsor, CT
 (Sarah b. 1800 d. 1825 - from find a grave)
Ann b. 12/10/1802 d. UNK - m. Orrin Clark of Somers, CT


About the 'e' in Potwin, some dropped it. Stephen (Part 3) went so far as to have it legally taken off and recorded with the Town Clerk. Another had it added when he became interested in genealogy. Some of his children kept it, others dropped it.



END of Part 4


(editor's note: Thomas Potwine is a recognized patriot - DAR #A091875)

©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, September 4, 2016

My Third Blogiversary!



September 5th marks the third anniversary of this here blog. The first post? Well, you can read it here. Samuel Faulkner started it all. I had been toying with the idea for quite some time. I loved the idea of a blog, but wasn't sure if it made sense. Blogging about my ancestors. MY ancestors. I was looking for something more than just a Family Tree - which I had made private years ago - to share my research, my grandmother's research, family photos, etc.

I considered a website.

Seemed like a lot of work for this very tech-UNsavvy gal.

Blog it was.

Google made it uber easy.

So, I stuck my toe in the vast blog sea.

Now, three years later, I've had one heck of a  bumpy ride. Fell off the wagon, got sidetracked. Made promises to myself that went broken. Lost track of what I initially set out to do. Felt defeated. Lost my purpose, found it again. Questioned my competence and the point of it all. Compared myself to the current darlings of genealogy - only to fall defeatingly short (in my opinion).

But, I kept on keeping on.

Along the way I've met a posse of new friends, not only in the genealogy realm but in the blogging world at large.  And I can honestly say I've found my tribe.

This past year has brought personal challenges beyond anything I've been challenged with so far in this lifetime. My mother's declining health and mental capacity. I've had to step into my designated role as POA. (Both for health and for property - big shoes ...) Most of my summer has consisted of keeping a jillion plates spinning on their wobbly sticks while jumping through flaming hoops on a unicycle. ....Um, at least that's what it felt like.

I've had to waylay my (well underway) plans to relocate to Florida to be near my grandchildren, (who moved away last July, taking most of my heart with them) as my mother's needs are now the primary focus.

Things are beginning to calm down as we all settle into our new roles, and I feel like I can actually breathe again. This past month I've been able to set some great goals for the blog and start a few new projects. I've come to the realization that these are not just MY ancestors and there are others who would like to hear the stories I can tell.

I believe that genealogy is the greatest hobby on earth and I am so happy to be a part of this awesome tribe of like-minded people who 'get me'! Thanks for tuning in, for supporting me, for reading my blog. Here's to another year of going deeper down that rabbit hole!


And I'm seriously considering that website.



©Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Book Of The Week: American Genealogy: Being a History of Some of the Early Settlers of North America


American Genealogy: Being a History of Some of the Early Settlers of North America and Their Descendants, from Their First Emigration to the Present Time ...

by Jerome Bonaparte Holgate

Written in 1851, there is still some interesting information in it!






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, September 2, 2016

Photo Friday :: Group Outing


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!



A mystery photo!
A picture postcard with nothing written on it.
I suspect it is the Irons family from Chicago Illinois.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Video Of The Week: Genealogy Methodology: Negative Evidence


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved