Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Frasers Of Fife: Generation Three | John Gibb and Mary Harries

1880 John Fraser Family Tree

8. John Gibb  (Margaret - 2, Duncan - 1) born July 13th 1805 - at Leslie.  John was a courier at Leslie.

married June 22nd 1827 at Glasgow

Mary Harries born May 26th 1815 at Glasgow. Daughter of James Harries and Elizabeth Mackie



Children of this union:


      i. John Gibb III b. June 1st 1838

29. ii. Elizabeth Gibb b. April 24th 1840

30. iii. James Gibb b. December 2nd 1841, married Elizabeth Curry

      iv. Alexander Gibb b. June 1st 1843

31.  v. William Gibb b. June 24th 1845, married Elizabeth Deas Miller

      vi. George Gibb b. February 7th 1847

      vii. Hugh Gibb b. November 1st 1848

      viii. Margaret Gibb b. February 13th 1851

32.  ix. Isabella Gibb b.July 12th 1854, married George Braid

      x. Mary Gibb b. July 12th 1854 (twin)

      xi. Jean Gibb - died in infancy





~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | Samuel Faulkner {Gen 1}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Samuel Faulkner was born to William and Mary in 1739/40, based on his grave marker. This date has not been proved. Presumed to have been born in Wallkill, Ulster Co, New York.

Samuel married Elizabeth Wilkin OR Helen Murray. Or both. See Finding Faulkner, parts 7, 8 and 9 for further information.

Samuel Faulkner's children include:

  • Female 1 Faulkner b. 1763 d. UNK
  • Female 2 Faulkner b. 1767 d. UNK
  • David Faulkner b. 1769 d. bef 1860 - bachelor
  • Robert Faulkner b. 1776
  • Mary Faulkner b. 1778
  • Col James Faulkner b. 1779
  • John M Faulkner b. 1782
  • Margaret Jane Faulkner b. 1783
According to land records, Samuel owned a sawmill and the Scotchtown Meetinghouse was located on a corner of his property. The History of Orange County records that Samuel was an elder of the Union Church at New Shawangunk.

Samuel Faulkner died 2 Apr 1811. He is buried in the Bloomingburg Rural Cemetery in Orange Co, New York




©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, August 29, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 3


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

Thomas Potwine (Rev.), sixth child, second son of John's first marriage. His mother being Mary Jackson of a prominent Boston family. Thomas was born October third or 13th year 1731, probably in Boston, Massachusetts. He graduated from Yale University and chose to devote himself to the humble calling of the ministry. He married Abigail Moseley in the year 1754. 

Thomas was the pastor of the Congregational church in East Windsor CT until 1759, for fifty years!

It was almost unbroken timberland and wilderness; only here and there clearings in the forest made by hardy pioneers. They decided to provide a meeting place of worship. In 1753 it was begun: 47 feet by 35 feet and 21 feet high. It was occupied in 1755, fully finished in 1759. Meetings were held in homes while it was being built. 

In August of 1753 it was voted to give Sir (another title of distinction rarely given) Thomas Potwine of Coventry a call to preach. (on probation). He was only 22 years old! At the end of two months they voted to give him 2000 pounds, old tender, as a settlement and 500 pounds for a yearly salary. 

Thomas wed Abigail Moseley in the year of 1754. Three children were born of this union. 

Thomas accepted the ministerial call. They voted two years later that if his salary should be insufficient, they would add to it as his circumstances called for, or their abilities would "admit". This has to be the first of a "cost of living increase". 

Father Potwine remained as their pastor for fifty years. 

May 1, 1754 Thomas Potwine was ordained. The meeting was held in a barn; a table was used as a desk, rough boards answered for spectators; only the ministers were seated on chairs. Standing room was filled. The heart of the young pastor and his congregation were filled with joy and thankfulness. 

In 1796 they began talking of adding to it or building a new one, there was much difference of opinion and hard feelings arose when voting was taken. The minority objected and that night the old meeting house was burned to the ground. The grief of the old pastor was great! He grew more feeble and died in about a year. 

Thomas' wife Abigail had died in the year 1759 and he had married for the second time. He married Lydia Hall in 1761; there were seven children born to them. It was probably during this generation that the final 'e' was dropped from Potwin.


GENEALOGY

Thomas Potwine (Reverend) b. Oct 3 or 13, 1731
                                                 d. Nov 15, 1802
                                                 m. 1754 to Abigail Moseley (his step sister)
                                                                    b. 1733
                                                                    d. 1759
                                   
                                                 m. 1761 Lydia Hall
                                                               b. 1734
                                                               d. 1817

Children:

With Abigail:
Abigail b. 1755 d. 1849
THOMAS b. 1756 d. 1824
Benjamin b. 1759 d. 1787

With Lydia:
Lydia b. 1762 d. 1817
Demaris b. 1764 d. 1853
Caleb b. 1765 d. 1846
Elizabeth b. 1768 d. 1823 (twin)
Mary b. 1768 d. 1768 (twin)
William b. 1774 d. 1794
Stephen b. 4/21/1776 d. 5/?/1864

Reverend Thomas Potwine, graduate of Yale; pastor of Congregational church in East Windsor CT, 1759 until 1802 (50 yr). Descendants stem from a second wife, Lydia Hall of Wallingford CT. Through Lydia descend many prominent families in the New Haven area - Atwater, Lyman, Peck, Sayer.

The Potwin homestead, built by Stephen. Later occupied by son Edward and then by his son Arthur. The home is now more than 100 years old. One Indian Chief so overjoyed to see the settlers coming that he gave land along the 'big river' (Connecticut) to the depth of a day's walk into the wilderness. It is recorded that no land was taken from the Indians but bought - paid for by barter.


END of Part 3




©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Book Of The Week: Americans of Royal Descent



Americans of Royal Descent: A Collection of Genealogies of American Families Whose Lineage is Traced to the Legitimate Issue of Kings
by Charles Henry Browning

An amusing tomb. Published in 1883, so there's that. Still fun to read!






©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, August 26, 2016

Photo Friday :: New Hat


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!


"Bess Twining"
"Corning Iowa"
"1897"
Carrie Elizabeth Twining Potwin
b. 1881 d. 1969
m. Irving A Potwin 1899

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Video Of The Week: Using the Google Goldmine for Genealogy - James Tanner



We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!







©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Frasers of Fife: Generation Three | Isabella Gibb and Hugh Fraser

1880 John Fraser Family Tree

7. Isabella Gibb (Margaret - 2, Duncan - 1) daughter of John Gibb - born 1802 at Leslie

married February 27th 1827

13. Hugh Fraser (William - 3, Duncan - 1) born October 5th 1802 at Kinglassie - Farmer at Ballingry Mill


Isabella and Hugh were first cousins




Children of this union:

27. i. Margaret Fraser b. November 27th 1827, married John Shaw

28. ii. William Fraser b. 1830, married Jessie Duncan

      iii. Agnes Fraser b. 1832

      iv. John Fraser b. October 1835 d. 1852


Isabella died April 27th 1860
Hugh died December 27th 1852




~ all information provided here has been taken directly from the John Fraser family tree compiled in 1880 and as such is the only source for these writings - the objective being to record his work for further study and documentation ~ 


Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Finding Faulkner: The Progeny | James Faulkner {Gen 1}


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.

James Faulkner was born to William and Mary on February 18th 1731, according to the Bull Family Book*. This date has not been proved. It is said he was born in Wallkill, Ulster Co, New York.

James married Catherine Bull, daughter of William Bull and Sarah Wells.

To them were born seven children (all town of New Windsor):


  • William Bull Faulkner b. 1758
  • Sarah Faulkner b. 1768
  • Joseph Faulkner M.D. b. 1770
  • Mary Faulkner b. 1773 d. 1859 - spinster
  • Catherine Faulkner b. 1781 d. 1833 - spinster
  • Martha Faulkner b. 1784 d. 1834 - spinster
  • Male Child b. 1786 d. 1795
From the Bull Book*: "James Faulkner resided in Little Britain, New Windsor Precinct, where he served as road commissioner in 1772, and as assessor in 1778-80. On 25 Oct 1775, he was commissioned 1st Lieut. on Capt. Wm Telford's Co, 2nd Regt. Ulster Co Militia under Col James McClaghry, and served throughout the Revolution. Little more is known about him."

James Faulkner died 5 Sep 1806. He is buried in the Goodwill Presbyterian Churchyard in Montgomery, Orange Co, New York.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

*The history and genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells family of Orange County, New York : the first six generations in America and Canada - McWhorter, Emma


Monday, August 22, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 2


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

John Potwine Sr, Esq. - a title very few had bestowed upon them. John was born in 1698, probably Boston. His marriage to Mary Jackson was April 20, 1721. There were ten children from this union. John married a second wife, Elizabeth Lyman Moseley, February 7, 1771.  

John was a gold and silver-smith; much of his work is displayed at the Boston Museum. 

He attended Yale University. 

He moved his family from New Haven, Connecticut to Hartford in 1740. There he had a store where he sold fine merchandise. 

His wife Mary was from a Boston family whose descendants number among many prominent families. John and his wife Mary are buried in East Windsor Connecticut.


GENEALOGY

John Potwine b. 1698 in America (Boston)
                        d. May 16, 1792
                        m. April 20, 1721 to Mary Jackson - (1st wife)
                                                          b. 1698
                                                          d. March 31, 1766
                        m. February 7, 1771 to Elizabeth Lyman Moseley (widow of Abner)
                                                              b. 1702
                                                              d. April 19, 1778

Children:
Mary b. 5/1/1722 d. 6/25/1730
Sarah b. 7/10/1724 d. 7/2/1730
Elizabeth b. 5/25/1726 d. 8/7/1751
John b. 5/7/1728 d. 8/20/1785 - lived in Weatherfield, CT - had 11 children
Ann b. 12/20/1729 d. 1/19/1731
THOMAS b. 10/3(13)/1731 d. 11/15/1802 - became Reverend T. Potwin    
Mary b. 3/26/1734 d. 5/22/1792
Nathaniel b. 6/8/1737 d. 6/20/1737
Sarah b. 2/24/1738 d. 4/14/1739
Sarah b. 6/25/1740 d. 9/?/1802


                                                             END of Part 2



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection



Saturday, August 20, 2016

Book Of The Week: The Expansion of New England 1620-1865



The expansion of New England; the spread of New England settlement and institutions to the Mississippi River, 1620-1865 by Lois Kimball Mathews


Read HERE: on Internet Archive



Or HERE: on Google Books
 



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, August 19, 2016

Photo Friday :: Sittin' With Kittens


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!



"Clark Stroup taken 1898"
Son of Mac Stroup and Jessie Wilcox Stroup
Born 1885/8 Died 1918
Drafted WWI 1917
Given name: Rossiter Clark Stroup


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Thursday, August 18, 2016

Video Of The Week: Best Practices for Attaching Records to Your Online Tree


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!









©2016 Anne Faulkner - Ancestor Archaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, Part 1


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


A STORY * OF THE POTYN * POTWINE * POTWIN * CLAN

This name of French derivation, coming from POITEVINE meaning inhabitant of Poitou or Poitier, a province in southwestern France - Anjou or Aquitaine, had figured in history over the centuries and been prominent all over the world.

The descendants have established families and pioneered and developed the continent of North America from coast to coast. The story, known in greater detail by me, who, fascinated by the courage and faith of my forefathers, forced my eagerness to if not fulfillment, certainly enjoyment of discovery and research.

No doubt it was a cold, blustery day (it might have been night, which would have compounded the fear and discomforts) when the courageous, weary and many ill voyageurs disembarked on the shores of America. No ocean liner, no greeting welcomers; it had been a long arduous crossing to Cape Cod so with prayers and thankfulness to God they proceeded to pick a plot where they might establish a 'home' and make a life for themselves and loved ones. This was IT! The beginning of the rest of their life!

Our man was JOHN. He may have been of the same lineage as the John mentioned in the records of the court of Charles II (15th century France) for John was a Huguenot. The Huguenots fled from France at the time of the persecution. They went to England, changed the name, the spelling that is, (Potevin to Potyn), and our man came came to America from England (some records say possibly Wales). In late 1600's (1685 or 1695) John Potyn (reference a letter from G.M. Potwin) also a Reverend Potyn sailed to America in 168(5) and he settled in Connecticut, changed the spelling of the name again. He took a second wife, after the death of his first one, "our branch of the family descend from this union." (ref. G.M. Potwin)

John Potwine, physician and "chirurgeon", OUR MAN of whom there is sketchy but genealogical, historically provable information, did come to Boston from England in 1695. He brought his wife from England and possibly a son. It is documented that he married Sarah Hill in Boston (presumed to be the second marriage). Sarah the daughter of Edward Hill, a prominent citizen of the province. John died early - in the early 1700's, leaving his widow and one son John.

So ends the first Generation in America.

GENEALOGY

John Potwine of French Huguenot descent came to Boston from England 1695. The name (in Boston records) is spelled various ways: Potwine, Pottwin, Potwin, Potwaine. The name comes from Poitevin(e) - meaning an inhabitant of Poitou or Poitier, a province in France, an area known as Aquitaine (Anjou) in southwestern France.

John Potwine was a "physician and chirurgeon" - - -. He may be of the same lineage as the John Potwine, physician, mentioned in records of the court of Charles II - 15th century France - but no real proof. In Boston he married Sarah, daughter of Edward Hill. So line in America begins:

John Potwine, physician, said to have been born in England, from whence the family came after fleeing France. Said to have died early - July or August 1700. He left a widow and one son John.


END of Part 1


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Finding Faulkner: Generation Zero | William and Mary


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Or, my original title: Faulkners of Wallkill: The Beginning | William and Mary Faulkender 


Poor Mary. Mary No-Name. Mary who received from her husband's estate the "use of the two back rooms in my house I now live in, with a bed and furniture and also her maintenance, together with the use of a horse and saddle for and during the term of her natural life." I guess it could have been worse. She did get two rooms and a horse!

Mary's maiden name is unknown. There is a mistaken notation on the Find A Grave memorial for James Faulkner, son of William and Mary, claiming that Mary's surname was Fernow. It is my conclusion that the note-leaver was confused, the will is listed in Fernow's Wills. Compiled by Berthold Fernow. When I questioned his/her source the reply was that it was 'clearly stated in the will'. It is not. The will calls Mary by her married name only.

I have found William as early as 1736, when he 'signs' as witness on a land sale.


Note William 'made his mark' AND that the scribe of this particular document decided to spell his surname 'Faulknier'. (Oh! Is this where that biography writer concluded that William was French?)

In 1738 William is listed as a private in Capt Bayard's Militia, precinct of Wallkill. (Spelled Faulkner/Falkener, depending on the source - in case you're keeping score)

William owned, best to my knowledge, five farms that included buildings, out-buildings and houses (how big are farms?) and an additional 1200 acres of undivided land. I'll explore this in detail when I discuss the will, later in this series.

My current theory is that William and Mary were married in Scotland prior to immigrating to the Colonies sometime around 1730. There are a dozen or more William Faulkner/Falconor/Falconer and Mary (variety of surnames) marriage records on both FamilySearch and ScotlandsPeople from around that time. I still need to investigate them. All I really have to base this on is the family tale ...

The known children of William and Mary are:
  • James b. 1731 - Ulster Co New York
  • Joseph b. between 1733/1744 (exact date UNK)
  • Samuel b. 1740 - Ulster Co New York
  • Col William Jr b. 1746 - Ulster Co New York
The author of the Bull Book suggested/suspected that John Faulkner, the father of Bethia, was also a child of this couple, as he was in the same place at the same time. That has not been proved.

I suspect that there were daughters as well.  The gaps between the sons would indicate more children. Only the lived-to-adult sons were named in the will, which leads me to believe John was not a son - perhaps a nephew. (Whoa! Whole other can of worms!)

William died sometime between 11 Sep 1783 when he dictated his Last Will and Testament, and 23 Dec 1784, when the Will was presented in Ulster Co Surrogate's Court. His burial is unknown.

Whether Mary outlived William is also unknown. The will is the first and last we hear of Mary No-Name. The Mother of generations.


To be continued .......



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved



Monday, August 15, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | Potwin Lineage and Genealogy, an Introduction


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


An introduction to Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas' compiled Potwin Lineage and Genealogy:

"Mrs. Beulah E. Simms Potwin was my truly faithful inspiration. I never met her. We were true "pen Pals". I was inspired to read telephone books; in the many towns and cities I would search for family names, (ours are rather unusual - Potwin (Twining), and call them on the phone. (People do enjoy talking about their families). This was years before 'roots' became popular.

Bob Potwin is listed in the Santa Monica phone book. In conversation with his (they live in Brentwood, CA) wife I learned of Mrs. Thomas D. Potwin (Bob's mother) who lived in Yakima, WA and that she also was interested in genealogy. For years we corresponded and I treasure, and still have, letters and linage material. She is no longer living, God rest her soul, as I at last have come to the the end of my family saga (my branch of the Potwin line) Her husband's father was a brother of my great grandfather. FANTASTIC! 26th day of April, 1980 

For 14 years I have amassed my treasures (ha). Not just the Potwin line; the Twining, Rowley, Ashby and Thomas. And oh, what active and diversified ancestors! I've researched Plantagenets (another lead from Beulah via Thomas Costain's books - she was a learned lady too) My mother would have enjoyed Beulah's letters. From my mother's family scrapbook I copied reams of papers with and of information that I incorporated in my "Family Story" (of both Potwin and Twining - fini - 4/16/80) In researching the Huguenots, where the Poitevine's figured greatly I found the Twinings (Pilgrims) and Rowleys (Roily is French) interested in the same causes and problems. From my mother's family scrapbook there is enough information for the 'other side'. I hope to put it together soon. There were many Potvins in Canada (different spelling). I should have looked up Twining when I lived in Canada; many migrated to Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and eastern Canada from England. Montreal phone books were full of Potvin family (of course M. is French). I brows through phone books in Torrence CA, Inglewood, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Westwood, Santa Monica and Brentwood.

Francis H. Potwin, Inglewood, who's father was Louis J. Potwin Jr. from Vermont. Mrs. Thomas D. Potwin's husband's family were in Connecticut where many of my line originated. (ETPT)

I wonder what the outcome or finished manuscripts would have been like had I become serious about genealogy before 1966. I do not know where I could have found more facts and stories. The last Christmas my husband, I and all the children were together I had completed a copy for each of the family tree. That was Christmas 1954! In the little room where the best seller 'Snake Pit' had been written; - no, no not by me! (ha) At that time I had meager information of the Thomas clan; all that Mother Thomas and Irene knew ...... "


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology. net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection

Sunday, August 14, 2016

Field Notes: Chasing Unicorns



Unicorns.

We all have them.

Elusive ancestors that hover just on the edge. Almost mythical. Every once in a great while we catch a glimpse; a casual mention, an also-ran lost to the annals of time. We know they're there, but no proof exists. Least-wise none that we have been able to ferret out.

And we ferret.

We search high and low.

We look in the most obscure places. We run head first down bramble covered paths. We post to message boards, hunt down distant cousins, contact anyone, anyone who might have a lead.

We stay up late and get up early.

We lock ourselves in our Cave for days on end, certain that the next unindexed image will contain the Holy Grail.

We begin to mumble. And snap at our household members. No! I do NOT have time to do (fill in the blank) can't you see that I'm busy! This is very important work here, people! VERY important! And it must be solved. NOW.

Then we catch something out of the corner of our eye. A mention in an old history book, or a land sale - just enough to throw up our hands and demand a T.A.R.D.I.S. right this minute.

How could our ancestors have been so thoughtless, not to leave a well documented paper trail? Who do they think they are, anyway? Living their lives, minding their own business. Really.

And the ones that magically appear out of nowhere? They're the worst!  Just tell me, how do you one day just "appear" in the Colonies with thousands of acres of land? Or in a very nice house in Poughkeepise? And for crying out loud - how do you just fall off the earth after all of this? I mean seriously.

Unicorns.

We chase unicorns.

But every once in a while .......

We actually catch one.



Are you chasing unicorns? Share your story in the comments - I'd love to hear I'm not alone!


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved.

Saturday, August 13, 2016

Book Of The Week: The Emigrant's Guide to the Western and Southwestern States and Territories ...



"The Emigrant's Guide to the Western and Southwestern States and Territories: Comprising a Geographical and Statistical Description of the States ; Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Ohio ; the Territories of Alabama, Missouri, and Michigan ; and the Western Parts of Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New-York ; with a Complete List of the Road and River Routes, West of the Allegheny Mountains, and the Connecting Roads from New-York, Philadelphia, and Washington City, to New-Orleans, St. Louis, and Pittsburg ; The Whole Comprising a More Comprehensive Account of the Soil, Productions, Climate, and Present State of Improvement of the Regions Described, Than Any Work Hitherto Published; Accompanied by a Map of the United States, Including Louisiana, Projected and Engraved Expressly for this Work."

 By Dr William Darby. Published in 1818. FREE on Google Books - contains interesting historical context to anyone with ancestors from these areas in these times.





©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Friday, August 12, 2016

Photo Friday :: Ralph's Muttonchops


This series was birthed from the large old photo album I rediscovered in the back of my closet. Many of the photos are from my grandmother's side of the family. There are also unknown photos that came with the album. Story goes my dad, an avid garage saler, picked up a celluloid covered Victorian era photo album on one of his scavenges. It already contained photos of an (as yet) unidentified family. My parents put our own vintage family photos in the album alongside the mystery family's.  As children we marveled at the old fashioned clothing and settings, often wondering who these people were and what their lives were like. Of course, we thought that ALL the people in the photos were our relations! It wasn't until my mom passed the album on to me after my dad died that I learned of the mystery family residing alongside our own!

I plan to share these photos over time, sometimes they will be my family, and identifiable, others will be of the mystery family. Thanks to the world wide web, they may find their way home yet!

Enjoy!



Ralph Bickford c. 1878.
Ralph was the son of  William Bickford and Elizabeth Ashby Bickford. Ralph was born in 1858 in Iowa. This photo was taken the year his mother died. Ralph died in 1880, just after Christmas. He is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery in Washington County IA, with his parents.


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | May I Introduce ........


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas. Family matriarch. Genealogy Queen. My grandmother.

"On a beautiful autumn day I arrived in time for breakfast. A blue-eyed, yellow haired girl grew up to be a fun loving tom-boy, surrounded with a loving family five generations. 

Church, school and community activities filled her impressive years as well as dancing, music lessons, Camp Fire Girls organization. She presented Anna Pavlova flowers after the ballet; taken into the Black Foot Indian Tribe, by given an Indian name during Pow-Wow. In High School she was presented a silver loving cup as winner in ice skating speed race. 

With beauty in all seasons in state of Iowa, we traveled by train to southern area to visit my grandparent's homes summer and Christmas holiday, and to northern lakes, where I learned to swim and dive. I lived through the experience of W.W.I. My uncle went overseas with the Rainbow Division. Everyone raised 'Victory Gardens'; celebrated 'Armistice Day'. In summer before High School I took my first trip out of the state of Iowa. 

I was first with 'Bobbed Hair'. I was the 'Flapper' generation! My father was a sportsman, the family camped, hunted, fished in northern Minnesota. This was by motor car before the highways, only paths through wilderness. 

I went to college: love steered my destiny! I married at 18 my high school mate. We were blessed with five little ones. We lived in Wyoming, Michigan, Canada and Illinois. I traveled across the states with four little ones to visit relatives before our life in eastern Canada for six years. The railroad travel was perfect. Excellent assistance with little ones. 

Having lived through W.W.I the World War II caught our sons. God brought them safely home. The education of the children was in progress when the father and husband was taken by death. 

Having had experience in community organizations, religious teachings, D.A.R, League of Women, P.T.A., Red Cross, Girl and Boy Scout organizations, fitted me for position of Home Mother in Illinois University. After the children graduated I drove my car, self and possessions across this huge country. I fell in love with southern California after a summer on Hawaiian Islands. I became a house mother in girls private school. 

While being a travel companion went to many countries in the world. I was active in D.A.R., fell in love with history, genealogy and became a Colonial Dames of XVII Century."


written as an introduction for her acceptance into Colonial Dames. 



©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved
©1980 Elizabeth Twining Potwin Thomas - private collection


Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Notes From My Grandmother | The What and The Who


Somehow, much of my grandmother's hand written and (badly) typed notes and research wound up in my possession. Traveling from Chicago to Los Angeles and back to Chicago again. It sat, in the dark of my mother's closet, until my dad passed and my mom decided to begin her great purge. Knowing I had picked up the torch, the next generation to pursue the Greatest Hobby on Earth, the papers came to live with me. Unsure for many years on just what to do with them, I have decided to bring them out and share them with you - transcribed, of course - no one can read my grandmother's handwriting! But in her own words; mistakes, rambling sentences, and all. I think she will be pleased her work and her writing are once again out in the light.


When I got the idea to present my grandmothers papers to the world, I really had no idea how to go about it. A lot of her writing is very bad, computers would have been her best friend! But she worked hard and poured her heart into her research. She truly loved history and genealogy ... and telling the family story. Limited only by the time in which she did her research (pre 1980), she was still able to compile some good stories. Solid research woven with family remembrances.  Had she had the technology we have today she would have been a rockstar! 

And a mad blogger ......

In my collection I have letters, photographs, unreadable (seriously) handwritten notes and "finished" typed family stories.  Surnames she researched include:
  • Potwin
  • Twining
  • Ashby
  • Thomas
  • Rowley
  • Busby
I will present these writings by surname, as that is the way she had them organized and it seems to make the most sense.

Much of this may be of little interest to many of you, but I suspect there are far-flung cousins for whom these writings will be of great interest. As for me, in transcribing these papers I will be required to go through the entire collection - something I've been avoiding for a while now. (Just keeping it real) I hope someone will find something useful, at any rate I'll enjoy rediscovering my maternal ancestors - pilgrims, pioneers, preachers, patriots, even Plantagenets!

Come on along for the ride!


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved


Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Video Of The Week: Using the U.S. Federal Census


We watch a lot of videos in the Cave. Webinars, instructional videos, continuing education videos, you name it! If it helps with our genealogical pursuit we are all over it!

Each week we thought we'd share one we've enjoyed.

Hope you enjoy it too!









©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

Monday, August 8, 2016

Finding Faulkner: Epilogue


It started, as good quests always do, with a family tale.


Well. 

Done and done.

Wrote the Proof Argument.

Well, never done, really ..... anyone who's ever been bitten by this genealogy bug knows that the search is never over, the story, our story, neverending. 

I succeeded in journeying back to 1700's New York and 'meeting' my 5th great grandfather. Still a man of mystery. So many questions still remain. Why did he leave Scotland? Why the Colony of New York? How did he get here? He was part of the New York Militia as early as 1738. He owned a substantial parcel of land. Scots were known as fighters ...... soldiers were often paid in land .... so many questions! (And the BIG one - where in Scotland is the Faulkner homeland?)

The Faulkner roots are deep in the founding of New York, and the United States. Farmers, soldiers, militia men, politicians, church builders, pioneers. They were well liked, honest, hard workers, trustworthy. Quietly, they got the job done. 

By my count, this original Faulkner immigrant is the progenitor of over 800 descendants! From one couple in the early 1700's we now have a far reaching lineage that spans over 250 years. Those of us with this Faulkner blood are in all corners of the United States. And go by many names.

I hope you have enjoyed the recanting of my saga as much as I have enjoyed sharing it. Family history, exciting stuff!

I plan to continue this study researching the progeny, exploring the will in more detail, introducing you to Samuel's brothers and getting to know the wives who married these Faulkner men. 

The Quest continues ....


©2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved

The Faulkners Of Ulster|Orange Co NY: A Proof Argument

William Faulkner, it is said, came to the Colony of New York from Scotland as a young man. This is family lore, and as yet is unproved.

William Faulkner was in New York as early as 1738. He was listed among the men serving under Captain John Byard in the company of militia of the "Wall a Kill" in Ulster County.(1)

It is reported by several historians that he resided at Stony Ford. In the book The History of Orange Co (2) it is said that "the Faulkner family made an early settlement" of the area.  From The Bull/Wells Family genealogy(3) it is reported that William served as Captain in the Ulster Co militia during the French and Indian war. His name appears in a 1763 muster roll as such.(4)  In an area rich with early pioneer stories, it is quite difficult to uncover much more on William, or other Faulkners of that time.

There has been much confusion as to the identity of William. Most of it stems from the numerous spelling variations of his surname found in the area surrounding Wallkill. Variations include Faulkener, Faulkender, Falkener, Falkner and Faulkner. His will has proved the biggest stumbling block. Spelled Faulkender, this will has been attached to many the incorrect family, in a variety of states surrounding New York.

After examining the records I have found to date, I feel I am able to make a convincing argument tying William Faulkner to his sons, William*, James and Samuel; and further establish lineage from Samuel to his sons Robert, John and James. (*William the son is a recognized DAR patriot, for the sake of clarity I will refer to him as Col. William when necessary,  from here forward) 

This direct evidence has come to light since the Record of Wills Recorded At Albany, New York, 1629 - 1802(5) has been digitized. We can now read the entire probate papers packet that establishes this tie.

William Faulkner died sometime between the writing of his will, dated 11 Sept 1783, Ulster County New York, and 23 Dec 1784, Ulster County New York, when it was entered into probate. William's will reveals that he was a landowner, and owned over 1000 acres of land plus several farms in Wallkill, Ulster Co, New York.

While the family surname is spelled Faulkender throughout the will, it is discovered that William was illiterate, merely 'making his mark' to sign his will. In examining the probate papers and bond of administration letter that follow the will it is further discovered that the three sons did actually sign their names, and in fact spelled their surname either Faulkner or Faulknor.(5)

Final page of William Faulkender's will papers showing William's surname spelled Faulkner along with the original signatures of his three sons, William, James and Samuel, inheritors named in the will.
(My own thought on this is that if William was a Scottish immigrant he may have spoken with a heavy accent. He may have been saying Faulkner (or Falconer), but it sounded like Faulkender! Consistent spelling remember, is a fairly new phenomenon)

To son William, he gives "the farm adjoining the Wallkill which I now live upon (...), one fifty acre lott on the long hill and two hundred acres of my undivided part of the lott of one thousand acres lying in or about the pine swamp". To son James, he gives "the farm he now lives upon (...) and providing that he shall convey to his youngest son when he shall arrive to the age of twenty one years that part of said farm formerly occupied by my son Joseph, while alive". To son Samuel, his gives "the farm he now lives upon, together with one fifty acre lott on the long hill and also two hundred acres of my undivided part of that lott of one thousand acres in or about the pine swamp".(5)

By this will we know that in 1784 there were at least three Faulkner males living in Wallkill.

In the 1790 census of Wallkill, Ulster Co, New York there are 3 Faulkner heads of household. The name is spelled Falkener in this record(6)  Samuel, William and James' oldest son, also named William.

There is only one Samuel listed in the town of Wallkill in the census years 1790 through 1810.(6)(7)(8)

In 1807 Samuel deeds some of his land and farm to his son, David, and names his other sons, James, John and Robert, in the transaction. "(...)being a part of that farm or lot of land upon which the said Samuel Faulkner now lives which is bounded as follows (to wit) Northerly by a lot of land sold by the said Samuel Faulkner to his son John Faulkner, Westerly by lands sold by the said Samuel Faulkner to his son Robert Faulkner, southerly by lands of Col. William Faulkner, easterly by the patent line of said tract of one thousand acres containing one hundred and thirty acres (...)" "if the said David Faulkner should die without lawful issue of his body begotten then the remainder over to Robert Faulkner, James Faulkner and John Faulkner, sons of the said Samuel Faulkner (...)"(9) 




By this we learn that some of Samuel's land was adjacent to Col. William's land. This evidence strongly suggests that this is the same Samuel and William as recorded in the will of William Faulkender, above.(5)

Col. William Faulkner died in 1831 and in his will leaves land to his son William J. and his daughters Susan McBride, Jane and Martha Faulkner. "First, I give and bequeath unto my son William J the farm on which I live situated in the said town of Wallkill and containing about two hundred acres. Also a fifty acre lot situated in said town of Wallkill on the Long Hill (...) to my daughters Susan McBride, Jane Faulkner and Martha Faulkner (...) I give and bequeath a lot in the pine swamp in the said town of Wallkill containing about forty acres of land"(10)

The description of the land owned by Col. Faulkner is similar enough to the description of the land given to William the son of William Faulkender as to draw a reasonable conclusion that Col. Faulkner is the son. Further, William Faulkner is a proved DAR patriot, ancestor # A039331 and his descendant listings associated with him are the very surnames listed in his will(10)

  • Looking at the 1800 census, again there are 3 Falkener (note spelling) heads of household.(7) Samuel, Agnes who is William's widow and John who is Agnes' son.

  • 1810 shows 5 Faulkner heads of household.(8) Samuel, Robert who is Samuel's son, Col. William, John and Mathew who are sons of James

  • 1820 4 Faulkner heads (11) Col. William, James and John M who are Samuel's sons, and Mathew.

  • 1830 2 Faulkner (12) Col. William and William J., his son.


In 1839 There is a land sale recorded in Orange Co New York between David, James, John and Robert Faulkner and David Woodruff "This indenture made the fifth day of October in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty nine, between David Faulkner, James Faulkner and Martha Faulkner, wife of the said James, all of the town of Grass Lake, county of Jackson and state of Michigan, and Robert Faulkner and Sally, his wife, of of the town of Ontario, county of Wayne, and state of New York, and John M Faulkner and Catherine, his wife, of the town of Benton, county of Tioga, and state of New York, all parties of the first part and David Woodruff of the town of Wallkill, county of Orange, state of New York, party of the second part (...) for consideration of five thousand dollars lawful money (...) northerly by a lot of land formerly owned by John M Faulkner westerly by a lot of land formerly owned by Robert Faulkner southerly by land formerly owned by Col Wm Faulkner easterly by the patent line of the Elinor Tract of which this is a part containing one hundred and thirty acres of land " This document was witnessed by Antonette Faulkner, James and Martha's daughter.(13)



Although there is no known documents to prove this William and Samuel are the same William and Samuel named in the will of William Faulkender, the evidence is compelling and backed by the census records showing that they were the only likely candidates, and thus we can conclude that Samuel and William are the sons of William Faulkender.

In conclusion, although the evidence presented is indirect I feel it is conclusive, and sufficient to tie William Faulkender to Samuel, James and William and to further tie William to Samuel and thusly tie Samuel to Robert, David, John and James.





©Copyright 2016 Anne Faulkner - AncestorArchaeology.net, All Rights Reserved





(1)New York Colonial Muster Rolls, 1664-1775, Vol 1, Report of the State Historian of the State of New York, Appendix H, Muster Rolls of a Century, pg. 608 [database on-line]
(2)Ruttenber, E.M. and Clark, L.H., History of Orange Co New York with Illustrations, Philadelphia: Everts and Peck, 1881 [pg 431]
(3)McWhorter, Emma, Seaman, Phillip and Booth, Dolly, The history and genealogy of the William Bull and Sarah Wells family of Orange County, New York: the first six generations in America and Canada, T.E. Henderson, 1974 [pg 131]
(4)New York Colonial Muster Rolls, 1664-1775, Vol II, Report of the State Historian of the State of New York, Appendix M, Colonial Muster Rolls, pg 735 [database on-line]
(5)Will of "William Faulkender", dated 11 Sept 1783,  Albany, NY, Wills, Ad - Af 1629 - 1802, New York Surrogate's Court, Albany Co, [New York Wills and Probate Records, 1659 - 1999 database on-line] 
(6)Year: 1790; Census Place: Wallkill, Ulster, New York; Series: M637; Roll: 6; Page: 213; Image: 479; Family History Library Film: 0568146 
(7)Year: 1800; Census Place: Wallkill, Orange, New York; Roll: 21; Page: 337; Image: 344; Family History Library Film: 193709 
(8)Year: 1810; Census Place: Wallkill, Orange, New York; Roll: 29; Page: 467; Image: 0181383; Family History Library Film: 00259
(9)"New York Land Records, 1630-1975," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32871-19260-30?cc=2078654 : accessed 6 April 2016), Orange > Deeds 1812-1814 vol O-P > image 11 of 534; county courthouses, New York. 
(10)New York Probate Records, 1629-1971," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-28504-23777-43?cc=1920234 : accessed 6 April 2016), Orange > Wills 1830-1837 and 1787-1797 vol 1-2 and A > image 247 of 687; county courthouses, New York. 
(11)1820 U S Census; Census Place: Wallkill, Orange, New York; Page: 344; NARA Roll: M33_64; Image: 357 
(12)1830; Census Place: Wallkill, Orange, New York; Series: M19; Roll: 113; Page: 145; Family History Library Film: 0017173 
(13)"New York Land Records, 1630-1975," images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32877-943-38?cc=2078654 : 22 May 2014), Orange > Deeds 1839-1840 vol 66-67 > image 8 of 664; county courthouses, New York.